Bouldering in the Buttermilks – Bishop, California

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about bouldering in the Happy Boulders, and I said that I’d write up the second part of our bouldering trip in Bishop, California. Well, better late than never – here it is – bouldering in the Buttermilks.

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If you’ve ever seen pictures representing bouldering in California, it was probably one of two places, Joshua Tree National Park or the Buttermilks in Bishop, California.

Greyson Bouldering Buttermilks

Mountain Project describes the Buttermilks as:

“The scenic and awe-inspiring Buttermilk Country has long been one of California’s premier bouldering destinations with a long history of ground-breaking ascents and some of the proudest, boldest, and most aesthetic lines in the world. These massive glacial erratic boulders sit in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada under an impressive backdrop of high peaks just a mere four miles to the west. Granite-like quartz monzonite makes up the boulders featuring sweeping blank faces, polished patina crimps/plates and sharp slopers and edges.

Buttermilks bouldering is BIG, literally. Some of the larger stones rival the largest erratics known anywhere. Many problems here feature reachy standing or jumping starts with huge moves, so on many routes you’ll soon find your feet well above a height you’d want to drop off. Don’t leave any pads at home because alot of the classics top out at 20+ feet, luckily most of the landings are flat and uniformed. Before you hop on a boulder scout the down-climb first, as many require some techy down-climbing and/or a big jump to the ground.”

These highball, glacial erratics are iconic in the world of bouldering, with world famous problems ranging from V0 all the way up to V14+. One incredibly highball route, The Process on Grandpa Peabody, was featured in Reel Rock 10’s High and Mighty.

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The Buttermilks are a fun area with a ton of different problems, but warning – they tend to be on the more difficult side. I flailed around unsuccessfully on most of the V1s, and the V0s seem harder than in other places.

Lynn bouldering Buttermilks

In addition to world class climbing, the Buttermilks are worth visiting just for the views. The day we visited this fall was foggy and cold, but the mountains occasionally peeked out.

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If you have any interest in bouldering, the Buttermilks is a place to put on your must climb list. At my current beginner skill level, I prefer bouldering in the Happy Boulders, but I love going to the Buttermilks at least once while I’m in Bishop. They’ve got an amazing vibe full of world class climbers, and it’s inspiring to be around.

How to Get There: The Buttermilk bouldering area is easy to find. Head west on Highway 168 from Bishop, and turn right on Buttermilk Road. There are designated parking areas on the right about 3.5 miles up Buttermilk Road, near the boulders .

Where to Stay: There’s camping at Pleasant Valley & the primitive Pit Campgrounds, as well as free camping before and after the Buttermilks main area. Bishop also has a hostel,The Hostel California, that I hear is pretty cool, though I’ve never stayed there.

Where to Eat & Drink: Mountain Rambler Brewery, Taqueria Las Palmas

Bouldering in the Happy Boulders – Bishop California

I needed to be down in Bishop, California for work last week, so Greyson and I decided to go down on Saturday and make a weekend of it. Not that we ever need an excuse to go to Bishop, but the American Alpine Club was hosting a stop of the Craggin Classic there during that weekend. We were excited to check it out.We took our time driving down on Saturday, stopping to check out the fall colors and expansive views whenever we felt the urge – like the Mono Lake lookout.

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Coming over Conway Summit (north of Mammoth Lakes) I spotted a huge bird flying parallel to our car. It landed in a tree a few hundred feet off of the road, and we were able to pull over on the side of the road and check it out. I had my binoculars, and Greyson had his longest lens so we were able to see it pretty clearly. We debated whether it was a juvenile golden or bald eagle, and finally settled on juvenile bald eagle (with help from instagram). He or she was quite content to hang out in the tree, so we watched it for quite awhile before moving on.

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Photo by Greyson Howard.

We pulled up  in Mammoth Lakes for lunch, beer sampler and growler fill at Mammoth Brewing Company. I’ll have to do a full review of Mammoth one of these days, but they’ve recently started serving food. I had a brussels sprouts salad and some of Greyson’s black currant, arugula, goat cheese, gruyere, and balsamic flatbread pizza and both were to die for.

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We arrived in Bishop early enough to set up camp at Pleasant Valley Campground. Last time we stayed there, I got eaten up by biting ants and the campground was filled with RVs plastered in confederate flags whose occupants partied late into the night. We vowed not to come back, but the price ($14 a night) and location lured us in. We figured that the cold weather and off season (for everything except bouldering) would keep the ants and noisy neighbors at bay.

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Greyson re-stakes the tent in a windstorm, during a previous Pleasant Valley Campground experience.

One of the best reasons to camp at Pleasant Valley Campground is its proximity to the Happy Boulders.

Bishop, California is a bouldering mecca, and people come from all over the world to climb in the area. There are several well-known areas, and the Happy Boulders are arguably the most beginner-friendly. Not to say that there’s not a bunch of challenging routes for the hard core, but I was able to find lots of routes to play around on that fit my VB-V0 skill level.

The Mountain Project describes the Happy Boulders as:

“The Happy Boulders offer highly concentrated world-class volcanic bouldering with hundreds of worthy problems ranging from simple to impossible.

Long shadowed by the more well-known and publicized Buttermilks, more and more climbers are realizing the potential inside the Happy Boulders canyon. Most first-time visitors will be overwhelmed by the amount of projects they just gathered and will find themselves making time to return. Some say at the Happies your muscles will fail first, whereas in the Buttermilks its usually your skin that will be your reason for leaving. Regardless, it’s nice to have the options so close. Visitors experiencing Bishop in the colder months can find shelter and warmer temps here rather than the exposed and wind-swept Buttermilks.”

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The parking lot was fuller than I’ve ever seen it before, as the crisp November days make for awesome climbing. We were a little worried about the crowds as we hiked up the loose, kitty litter gravel to the boulders, but once we arrived we saw that most of the people there were crowded at a couple of classic routes.

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Photo by Greyson Howard

These routes are far above my pay grade, but it was fun to watch people climb them. The best was when the girl pictured above made the route look easy after two muscled, shirtless climber bros failed on it! I have no idea what routes or boulders I actually climbed (next time we’ll remember to bring the book!), but I had a blast. Everything I climbed was easy in the scheme of things, but I did challenge myself a few times. Greyson claims that I fist pumped and said “Yes!” when I got to the top of a particularly challenging route, but I’m not sure if I believe him.

One of the many cool things about Bishop is that it’s packed with truly awesome climbers to watch and learn from. I’ve said it before, but while mountain biking is number one in my heart and will likely stay there, the people I’ve met climbing and bouldering are the best. They are friendly, outgoing, encouraging and really just want you to send it!

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Another great thing about Bishop in general and specifically the Happy Boulders is the literally hundreds of routes within a short walking distance. When we got tired of working on a problem, or our feet and fingers needed a break, we just packed up and walked 10 – 100 yards until another boulder caught our eye. We also hiked to the top of the Happy Boulders area for the first time and caught an awesome view.

I’m pretty out of shape for climbing (especially finger toughness), so we called it a day during the afternoon and drove into town. We had to stop by Mountain Rambler for a beer and lunch. I had the Phainopepla Black IPA (phainopepla is a type of silky fly catcher, FYI), Greyson got the Sky Pilot Pale Ale, and we split a Picture Puzzler Session IPA. The chef was testing out a beer fondue recipe which we got to sample, along with some beer caramels. I hope they’re both on the menu soon.

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Bishop is a must-visit destination for climbers of any levels and I’d highly recommend the Happy Boulders as a place to start. They’re easy to get to, have something for every level of climbing, and a great scene. When you’re there, be sure to stick to the paths, stay out of the plants, and pack out your garbage. “Crush the problem, not the plants!”

Check back next week, and I’ll be writing about the other place we bouldered, the Buttermilks!

How to Get There: The Happy Boulders Trail is located on Chalk Bluff Road north of Bishop. There’s a gravel parking area with an interpretive sign and a trail marker directing you where to go.

Where to Stay: There’s camping at the nearby Pleasant Valley & the primitive Pit Campgrounds. Bishop also has a hostel, The Hostel California, that I hear is pretty cool, though I’ve never stayed there.

Where to Eat & Drink: Mountain Rambler BreweryTaqueria Las Palmas

Indoor Climbing, Truckee Airshow and Tahoe City Trails

I had a really low-key weekend, but I also managed to fit in a few activities. We had been having early – late afternoon thunderstorms for most of last week, which put a damper on the usual afterwork outdoor activities. My softball game on Thursday even got rained out! By Friday, I was ready to do something. Since I didn’t want to play chicken with potential lightening, I convinced Greyson that we should head over to Incline Village to climb and the indoor climbing gym at High Altitude Fitness.

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High Altitude Fitness climbing wall photo via High Altitude Fitness

High Altitude Fitness is a swanky gym with a really nice climbing wall. It’s pretty much the only “real” indoor climbing wall in the Tahoe Basin (but they’re supposed to open up a Truckee location at some point!). They’ve got bouldering, auto belays and top roping, as well as a few routes bolted for sport climbing (bring your own rope). They re-set routes pretty often, and the ones I climbed on Friday (5.8 – 5.10a) were some of the most fun indoor climbing routes I’ve ever tried. There’s also a lounge area where you can get a smoothie or a $2 PBR and take a break. High Altitude Fitness is a full gym, with cardio machines, a weight room, fitness classes, etc., but I’ve only ever used the climbing wall, but they look pretty nice! They offer a ten pass punch card for $152 ($110 for locals!), which is a pretty great deal, especially compared to the cost of other regional climbing gyms.

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Kelly climbing at High Altitude on Ladies Night

Hight Altitude Fitness seems to run specials and deals fairly often. Off the top of my head, I have gotten a half priced locals pass at their screening of Valley Uprising earlier this year, I’ve climbed for free on their Wednesdays Ladies Night and gotten a two-for-one entry for Date Night Friday. Note: High Altitude did not pay me to write this – I just really love their climbing wall, and I’m excited for their Truckee location to open!

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On Saturday, I attended the Truckee Airshow at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. While attending the air show isn’t necessarily something I’d think to do on my own, I ended up enjoying it. Greyson and I worked a booth there, soliciting public feedback and handing out re-usable grocery bags. After the mostly stormy weather during the week, it ended up being a gorgeous day. We were stationed in a pop-up tent, but I kept dragging my chair into the sunshine to enjoy the warmth and see more of the show. There were all sorts of cool planes and helicopters set up on the tarmac and flyovers throughout the day. There were a couple of really great trick pilots doing flips and loops that made me dizzy just watching, and I also really liked the flyover by the WW2 Bearcat and Wildcat.

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I’m semi in the market for a new bike – because three bikes is not enough, right? I’m not ready to buy one quite yet, but I’m narrowing down what I’m interested in. I currently have a hardtail Cannondale cross country bike and a full-suspension bike (GT Sanction) with 6 inches of travel that’s great on the downhills, but not the easiest for pedaling. So I’m looking for a trail bike that’s somewhere in between the two. I have a couple of models in mind (Transition Scout, Specialized Stumpjumper, Trek Remedy, etc.), and I hope to try out a bunch before I’m ready to buy.

This weekend, Specialized was doing a free demo day at a couple of local bike shops. I missed out on the Truckee day on Saturday due to the airshow, but they were in Tahoe City on Sunday at Olympic Bike Shop. Greyson and I headed to Tahoe City with tentative plans to demo bikes on new-to-us trails and then head to the beach for Concerts at Commons Beach (free live music on Sundays at the beach).

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I was luckily able to borrow the exact bike I wanted to try – the 2016 Specialized Stumpjumper 650b! We got some beta on which trails to try, and Greyson and I headed up the steep hill to the Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area/Burton Creek State Park. The climb to the trails was HARD! There was a ~0.5 mile climb up a very steep paved road and then you kept climbing up fire road for another mile. It ended up being ~600 feet of climbing in ~1.5 miles. The bike I was demo-ing climbed really well, and I don’t even want to know what that would have felt like on my Sanction.

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When we got to the trail portion, I was kind of underwhelmed. I’ve heard this area is full of tons of unmarked and hard to find trails, so it’s quite possible we were just not on the fun stuff. The sections of trails we rode were pretty flat and boring, and, probably due to our lack of knowledge, we spent a lot of time on fire roads. Judging by the trails we rode, I didn’t think they were worth the climb! We did end up on one short section that I thought was really fun, but it pretty quickly turned to steep, loose rocks. I attempted to go down this section, and I did not succeed. I crashed the demo bike! The bike and I both ended up being fine, but I do have some nice scrapes and a partially-pulled off thumbnail. Gross.

Luckily, we were close to the end of the trail, and I limped back to the bike shop, dirty and embarrassed. All in all, I really liked the Stumpjumper, but I don’t think the rear suspension was set up optimally for me and I’m not in love with the 1×11 gearing. I’m hoping to be able to ride the Stumpjumper again this summer, hopefully on trails I’m familiar with, so I can do a comparison to my current bikes.

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Due to the drought, the Concerts at Commons Beach is currently not exactly on the beach, but it was still fun to sit outside in perfect temperatures and listen to music.

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We were both starving, so we didn’t end up hanging out at the concert for very long, but it was a great way to cap off a fun weekend!

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My Favorite Women-Led Adventure Films

Hilary Oliver at The Gription wrote a great post today called “Why are there so few women’s adventure films?” You should definitely go read the post, but she started it by saying:

“It’s been a thing for a while now, this underrepresentation of women in adventure films. Why?It seems we’re not really making them, or at least not enough of them. And why is that? Well, it’s complicated—but the solution might come down to you and me.”

And concluded with:

“Maybe it’s time for us to simply start telling those stories we see that need to be told—to stop wondering why someone else isn’t doing it, and just do it ourselves.”

The issues of under- and negative representation of women is something that is very important to me, and Hilary’s post inspired me to put together a short list of my favorite adventure films that are made by, feature, and/or star awesome women!

  1. The Little Things by Marie-France Roy & Darcy Turenne

The Little Things

I mentioned this film in the roundup of my favorite films of the Wild & Scenic Film Festival. “Follow professional snowboarders who have chosen to be outspoken and make positive changes towards a sustainable environment. This film is an initiative taken on by one of snowboarding’s most influential riders, Marie-France Roy, in hopes of inspiring others towards sustainability through inspirational speakers, positive ideas, and leading a healthy lifestyle. They keep it positive and showcase some of the little things that people can do to contribute to positive changes for the future of our environment.” The Little Things also happens to be the feature film at the Sierra Nevada Alliance’s 10th Annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe. Get your tickets today!

  1. Push It by Jen Randall

I had a chance to see this film at last year’s Wild & Scenic Film Festival (honestly, where I end up seeing most of my adventure movies). I had just signed up for a beginning climbing class, and this film was totally inspiring. Push It flashes between two friends preparing for their first ever big wall climb and the stories of and advice from professional women climbers. “Two women prepare for their first ever big wall – El Capitan in Yosemite, which goes far from smoothly from start to finish. Along the way, we visit climbing heroines for inspiration – and we overcome broken bones, awful weather, a lack of funds and several crisis of confidence.

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  1. Georgena Terry by Amanda Zackem

This is super short, but well worth watching. A Terry saddle is next on my bike wishlist! “This short documentary is about Georgena Terry, founder of Terry Bicycles. Terry revolutionized the women’s biking industry by creating a frame specific to a woman’s body. This is the story of how she got her start and the challenges within the women’s biking movement.

  1. Nobody’s River by Amber Valenti, Skip Armstrong & Wazee Motion Pictures

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Photo via nobodysriver.org/

Another film I recommended earlier this year, Nobody’s River combines adventure, gorgeous scenery, female friendship and epic dance offs. “Four women journey down one of the world’s last free flowing rivers of the world and discover raw beauty, industrial wastelands, devastating loss, and unbridled joy.”

  1. Solstice by Andy Hofman


I like my runs to be well under 5 miles, but I couldn’t help but be inspired by Ashley Lindsey as she runs 100 miles in the Western States Endurance Race. I may even run 6 miles someday! “1 Woman. 1 Day. 100 Miles. And an attempt to prove that “impossible” is just a word. Ashley Lindsey’s mission to finish the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains—the world’s oldest and most prestigious trail race from Squaw Valley to Auburn—is documented in this film where she batters bitter cold, stifling heat, and her own mental and physical limitations along the way.

These are just a few of the adventure films made by and featuring awesome women that often fly under the radar. What are some of your favorites?

Climbing at Smith Rock in Oregon

At the beginning of the month, Greyson and I took a road trip up to Bend, Oregon. I’ve already written about the beer and biking, but we did one other main activity while we were there: climbing and camping at Smith Rock State Park.

Smith Rock State Park, Bend, Oregon // tahoefabulous.com

The Oregon State Parks website says this about Smith Rock:

If you enjoy scenic views of deep river canyons or rock climbing, Smith Rock State Park is the place for you. There are several thousand climbs in the park. More than a thousand are bolted routes. We also offer miles of hiking and mountain biking trails. Along your trip through the canyon, you might see golden eagles, prairie falcons, mule deer, river otter and beaver.

Smith Rock is a major rock climbing destination and the birth place of North American sport climbing. The Mountain Project describes the climbing at Smith Rock as:

“…Oregon’s premier rock climbing destination, and one of the best sport climbing areas in the United States. This world-renowned sport climbing mecca has more than once been at the focal point of the climbing world. Extensive development took place in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s by locals and international climbers alike, who put up scores of classic climbs on the tuff and basalt cliffs; development continues to this day with new moderates and cutting-edge routes going up each year. Ranging from classic beginner routes to hardcore testpieces on a wide variety of rock, there is truly something here for everyone. Although best known for its sport climbing traditional climbers can find plenty to be excited about here as well.

Located in the high desert in central Oregon, Smith Rock State Park’s cliffs and hillsides take a commanding presence over the surrounding terrain. The main cliffs are made of volcanic welded tuff, and surrounding bands of columnar basalt lie above the winding Crooked River…the prominent walls overlooking the Crooked River are home to many of Smith Rock’s most famous routes, but for those seeking some solitude and adventure there is plenty to be found on the back side or among the basalt columns in the Upper and Lower gorge. Monkey Face, perhaps the park’s most recognizable feature, sits proudly on the back side of Smith Rock with spectacular views of the Cascade Mountains and the arid landscape below.”

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Our first night in Bend we stayed in a vacation rental downtown, as we weren’t sure how late we would be getting in, and wanted to avoid setting up camp in the dark. The other three nights, we camped in the walk-in only camping at Smith Rock State Park, about a half an hour outside of Bend, and a quick walk to the climbing area and Crooked River. All of the camping is walk in only, and $5 per person (which includes hot showers and nice bathrooms!). It’s only about a two minute walk from the parking to the camping area, so carrying stuff from the car was really easy. There’s no fires or cooking at the campsites, so we just left all of the cooking implements (food, stove, pots & pans, etc.) in the car to make it even easier. The camping spots are just flat areas spread beneath the juniper trees, so pick your favorite and set up camp! This is definitely one of the best State Park campgrounds I’ve ever stayed in.

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Smith Rocks from the campsite at the state park.

One of the first things we did when we arrived in Bend was head to a gear shop and pick up a guidebook for climbing at Smith Rock. The friendly and helpful staff at Mountain Supply recommended Falcon Guides Rock Climbing Smith Rock State ParkWe started pouring over it while back at our campsite cooking dinner. Luckily, we a friendly local overheard us chatting and gave us a ton of great advice for fun climbs at our skill level.

We ended up spending our day of climbing on the campground side of the river at the Rope de Dope block. This particular block had a number of fun top rope climbs within my range (occasionally 5.10a) and access to the top anchors via a rope ladder. Greyson ended up leading up a 5.7 sport route to get to the top and set up our toprope (note: Smith Rock is known for HIGH first anchors), but it was nice to have the option.

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Greyson getting our gear set up at Rope de Dope block

Though we waited for the sun to come out and melt the frost before we headed down to climb, Rope de Dope was in the shade. It was February in the high desert, so we were dealing with freezing cold fingers. I spent more time trying to warm up my painfully cold hands in the sunny spots down by the river than climbing.

I made it up 5.7 How Low Can You Go (though it felt like a hard 5.7 for a warm up!). I flailed around quite a bit on the crux of 5.9 Shamu, but I persevered after a couple of attempts and made it to the top! The rocks of this area are very different than the Sierra granite that I’m used to, so that was fun to experience. There were a lot more little pockets for finger holds, but I didn’t realize how much I relied on smearing my feet on the granite until I was up there sliding all over the face of Rope de Dope.

After my successful ascent of Shamu, I was physically done and mentally exhausted. Climbing is hard work! I can’t wait to get into better shape so I can spend longer days climbing. Greyson agreed with me, so we packed up our gear and headed on the hike back up to camp. I was worried the climb out of the valley would be miserable, but it wasn’t too bad! Plus we had gorgeous views of Smith Rock, the Crooked River, and a clear look at the Three Sisters way off in the distance to distract us.

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Obviously, one of the best parts of climbing is the meal you eat immediately following. You’re usually hungry enough that a peanut butter sandwich or cheese quesadilla you packed tastes like the nectar of the gods. But since were were on vacation, we decided to live it up and head into Bend and really feast! We planned on hitting up an Indian restaurant that Greyson had been to before, but fate intervened and they weren’t open for the early bird special dinner we were looking for. I was freezing and hangry, so we stopped in a coffee shop to figure out our next step, and the barista recommended Wild Rose Northern Thai Eats – saying it was the best Thai restaurant she’s ever tried. She was right! I love Thai food and living in the Pacific Northwest spoiled me, but this was the most amazing Thai food I’ve ever tasted. Since the menu is all food from northern Thailand, the Thai restaurant staples like pad thai and hangover noodle that I’m used to seeing were not on the menu. We ordered curried basil noodles off the menu, and something off the (huge) specials board that the waitress recommended. Everything we ate was so good! Everything everyone around us ordered looked so good! I can’t recommend this place enough – it’s a little different than the typical Thai restaurant, but unique in the most delicious way.

 

Climbing at Green Phantom, Truckee, California

While we don’t have any snow yet in Tahoe, it’s started to get plenty cold. I’m afraid my outdoor climbing season might be over for the year. But I did manage to get one more day of climbing in last weekend when I was up in Truckee, in a great spot for people new-ish to outdoor climbing (like me!) and their more experienced climbing partners (Greyson).

Climbing Green Phantom, Truckee, California // tahoefabulous.com

We were up on Donner Summit in an area known as Green Phantom which has a variety of routes from 5.6 – 5.10+. We didn’t end up climbing on the actual Green Phantom this time (there were other people on it and we were freezing), there are several other bolted top rope routes available for climbing. We like climbing in this spot as it’s a quick and easy to access (you can hike down from the top or rappel) and is usually way less crowded than the other busy Donner Summit spots.

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The Mountain Project describes it as

“… almost directly below the old arching bridge at the top of the Donner Summit climbing areas. The cliff is not that tall but is excellent granite quality with great views of Donner Lake. There exist about 8 routes ranging from 5.8 to 5.10+, with other toprope possibilities. 3 of the routes are sport routes, while the rest are toproped. If you want to jump on some moderate face routes and don’t have a lot of time, this is a good place to go.”

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Green Phantom is made fairly obvious by its green coloring, and the other top rope routes are located to the right on the shorter faces. We usually warm up with an easy (5.6 according to Local’s Guide Rock Climbs of North Tahoe) route on the left corner of the shortest, furthest right face.

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There’s also a 5.9 crack climb (Fine Line) that’s obvious on this face. I made it up this one for the first time a couple of weeks ago, and I was so excited! This time around, it was so cold that we only lasted for two short routes each before calling it quits.

I’ve played around on the middle face, not making it up a route with a tough undercling (Undercling Thing, I think), and going up a fairly easy route (which I don’t think it was an official route). I’m excited to tackle the Green Phantom when it warms up again this spring!

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The top of the climb is rewarded with views of Donner Lake

Not only are these fun, fairly deserted climbs, but the view is killer! You’re looking down on Donner Lake and up to Grouse Ridge. You’re also pretty protected from the wind, but in the shade most of the day. If it’s a hot day, this is nice, but can really make for cold fingers on a late fall day. Make sure you also check out the view from the Donner Lake Overlook.

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Grouse Peak, another climbing and bouldering area in Truckee.

What: Green Phantom, Donner Summit, Truckee, California

Where: Head west and up Donner Pass Road (along Donner Lake) and park in the Donner Lake Overlook parking lot. Cross the road and walk under the bridge. You’ll end up on top of the routes. Turn right to find the anchors; turn left to head down the (slightly overgrown) trail to the bottom.

After: When you’re done, you should head into town and find my favorite new addition to Truckee – Pho Real – a pho truck! I’d recommend the pork pho, but the veggie also looked amazing for vegetarians and those who are not soy averse.

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Flashback Friday: Beginning Climbing at LTCC

Back in March I took Beginning Climbing as a PE Class at Lake Tahoe Community College. The class consisted of two Wednesday lectures where we learned about climbing history, technique, safety, etc., and two Fridays & Saturdays out climbing in the field.

I’d done a little climbing (mostly indoor at the gym) in college, and was interested in trying it again, but nervous to get started. The Beginning Climbing class at LTCC was the perfect introduction!

The first two days, we climbed at 90 Foot Wall just outside of South Lake Tahoe. We practiced rappelling, learned to belay and put the climbing techniques we discussed in class into action.

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Nice view!

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

Tiny green instructor at the top of 90 Foot Wall for scale.

For our second Friday of climbing, we headed to tackle some more difficult climbs at the Cosumnes River Gorge near Placerville. We did another, much more nerve wracking rappel with all our gear and then beat up our hands with our first crack climbs and squeezed into some interesting chimneys.

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

Setting up the scary rappel while our awesome instructor Damien checks my set up.

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

Cosumnes River Gorge. Can you spot the slackliner?

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

Two of my classmates try to figure out a weird section.

For our last day of class, we headed back to the South Lake Tahoe area and went to Pie Shop. This day definitely had the hardest routes, including a multi pitch that our instructor set up. While he was doing that, we watched the instructional assistants do a trad climbing demonstration on a 5.10 crack that I eventually climbed when they had the top rope set up. That route was by far one of the hardest things I’ve ever done!

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

A classmate on the difficult crack.

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

A view of the multi-pitch climb.

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

Great hand and foot holds on this section of the multi-pitch.

Beginning Climbing // tahoefabulous.com

LTCC Beginning Climbing class.

The other really cool thing about our last day of class was that we were way up high and had a great view of the “Golden Celebration” parade that went from Meyers to Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort to celebrate the three women from South Lake Tahoe who won medals at this year’s Olympics.

Highlights from the weekend: Eastern Sierra Edition

We left South Lake on Friday and meandered our way towards Bishop. We drove up to Virginia Lakes, snapped some photos of Mono Lake, ate the world’s best gas station food at the Whoa Nellie Deli, and set up camp at Pleasant Valley Campground near the Happy Boulders. I also had a chance to hang out with my old roommate, having beers in her beautifully xeriscaped yard.

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  • Since we were camped near our first bouldering destination, we got a slow start on Saturday morning. But eventually, I had my coffee and we headed down the bumpy road. Bouldering at the Happys was really fun, though I chickened out on some of the taller boulders. It was a million degrees, though, so I’d definitely bring plenty of water and a hat. We left the Happys and headed into Bishop for lunch. We lucked out and stumbled on Raymond’s Deli. It was so good that I was tempted to eat there for every meal after (As of 2/2018 Raymond’s is now closed!). I had a BBQ Roast Beef sandwich with Ortega chillis called the 51/50. It’s a lot of food, but I recommend it highly!

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  • After lunch we moved on to the Buttermilk Boulders. The view from this spot was incredible! I thought that the bouldering here was more challenging than at the Happys. That could be related to the fact that I had my first real bouldering fall and sliced open a couple of fingers on a sharp flake. Ooops. That was the end of bouldering for the weekend.

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  • My bloody hands meant that we went back into Bishop to find some hot running water and soap. Cleaning out the large flap of skin on my finger was not pleasant. Bet you’re super disappointed that I didn’t take pictures! Since we were in town, we grabbed some bread and cheese and beer for dinner back at our campsite. We got the “famous” sheepherder bread from Erick Schat’s Bakkery.
  • Our leisurely outdoor dinner plans were scrapped by a massive windstorm! We ate while crammed in the front seats of the Element, taking turns running outside to re-stake the tent. Eventually the tent blew completely away! We managed to catch it and re-stake it closer to the car for a little more shelter, and it stayed attached to the ground for the rest of the night. The windstorm eventually calmed down around dusk, though all of the other tent campers in our campground had given up and left!

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  • We headed out of town the next morning, very dusty, but refreshed. Before we left Bishop, we grabbed bagels from Great Basin Bakery. Since Tuolumne Meadows were reportedly still full of snow, we decided to ditch that part of our plan, and slowly worked our way north towards Tahoe. We detoured to Convict Lake, but it was a little cold for the short loop hike. In Mammoth, we to fill my growler at Mammoth Brewing Company and checked out their gorgeous new tasting room. I filled my growler with 395 IPA but also loved Hair of the Bear, a seasonal doppelbock. For lunch, we had burgers at Toomey’s. (which I thought was a little overpriced, but pretty good with an incredibly friendly waitress). Our last stop was the Travertine Hot Springs in Bridgeport. I love a good hot spring, and these are amazing, with gorgeous flowstone, views of the Sierra and multiple pools at different temperatures. They were pretty crowded though, especially for the middle of the day.

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It was a totally fun weekend, and I’m excited for more throughout the spring and summer. Though I can do without the sliced up hand!