Best Breakfast & Brunch Places in Truckee

Who doesn’t love a dank breakfast burrito, flaky croissant, or amazing bagel sandwich? I am a huge breakfast person and will happily eat breakfast foods at any time of day. While I love a good, long brunch, sometimes you just need a quick meal on your way to the mountain, whether you’re snowboarding, biking or hiking. These are my favorite places to grab a quick and delicious meal when I’m in a hurry (in no particular order).

1. Truckee Bagel (11260 Donner Pass Rd. in the Safeway shopping center)
Truckee Bagel has been around since 1994, and they know what they’re doing. The bagels are great, and they have a wide variety of spreads and sandwiches. Tip: Get there early, they often run out of their most popular bagels by early afternoon. What to Order: The Castle Peak (Smoked Turkey, Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Onions, Capers, Sprouts, Cream Cheese & Larrupin’s Mustard-Dill Sauce) on a combo bagel.

Best Truckee Breakfasts, Truckee Bagel // tahoefabulous.com
Photo from Truckee Bagel

2. Full Belly Deli (0825 Pioneer Trail Rd. Ste 103)
Full Belly Deli might be better known for their lunch sandwiches, but their breakfasts are incredible too. They serve the best breakfast burritos in town. Breakfast is served all day, and be sure to check their Facebook for the daily special – sometimes it’s a biscuits and gravy burrito! What to Order: GNAR Burrito (dry rubbed tri-tip, pepperjack cheese, green chilies, hash brown, southwest sauce and a fried egg)

Best Truckee Breakfasts, Full Belly Deli // tahoefabulous.com
Photo from Full Belly Deli

3. Wild Cherries Coffee House (11429 Donner Pass Rd.)
Weekdays or weekends, Wild Cherries is packed and busy, but the service is usually fast and always friendly. It’s a great place to pick up breakfast for a crowd. There are bagels, pre-made breakfast burritos, pastries, smoothies – something for everyone. What to Order: Cranberry Bagel Sandwich (Turkey, Cream Cheese, and Cranberry Sauce) on a whole wheat bagel.

Best Breakfast in Truckee, Wild Cherries Coffee House // taheofabulous.com
Photo from Tahoe.com

4. Coffeebar (10120 Jibboom St OR 12047 Donner Pass Rd.)
If you’re looking for excellent pastries, Coffeebar has what you want in two locations. Their menu is frequently changing, but usually has great standbys like several croissant varieties, energy bites, and seasonal muffins. The downtown location has a larger menu, with options like breakfast bowls and avocado toast. What to Order: At the downtown location – Ricotta Toast, At the bakery location – a savory cheese twist pastry.

Best Breakfasts Truckee , Coffeebar// tahoefabulous.com
Photo from Coffeebar

5. Dark Horse Coffee Roasters (10009 W River St)
If I want the best coffee combined with the best vibe, I head to Dark Horse Coffee Roasters. While they do have breakfast options, bagel sandwiches and scones, the coffee is the star of the show. They roast the coffee in house, the owners are incredibly nice, there’s always interesting art on the walls, it’s right next to the Truckee River – what’s not to love? What to Order: Cold Brew Latte with House Made Vanilla Syrup.

Best Breakfasts in Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
Photo from the San Diego Reader

Even More Summer Things To Do In Truckee

I recently shared a bunch of Truckee summer outdoor adventures that I love, and I’m back to share more fun things to do! While not all of these activities take place outdoors, they still take advantage of the nice summer weather and beautiful environment of Truckee!

More Summer Truckee Activities // tahoefabulous.com

Food & Drink
Beer: It’s no secret that I love beer, and our beer options in Truckee have been getting better and better! My #1 local brewery is still Alibi Ale Works, but the newer Truckee Brewing Company is quickly becoming a favorite. Mellow Fellow is a tap house in downtown Truckee with dozens of beers on tap (they recently had Pliny the Elder!). They’re also the northern California’s tasting room for Modern Times Beer, so they always have those beers on draft as well.
Alibi Ale Works // tahoefabulous.org

Wine: The best place to buy a bottle of wine is The Pour House on Jibboom Street in downtown Truckee. The owners put a lot of thought and effort into their wine choices and they have a huge selection. They’re always tasting something interesting and they have an excellent cheese selection as well. Though it’s not located on the river, Truckee River Winery is worth stopping by. They not only have good wine, I love hanging out in their outdoor space. Get snacks and a bottle of wine and play some bocce in the sun.

The Pour House // tahoefabulous.com
Photo via truckee.com

Happy Hour: There are some great happy hour deals in downtown Truckee, and my favorite is at Pianeta, an excellent Italian restaurant. Happy hour is only at the bar and it’s best to get there a little before 5. They have $6 house wine, $5 beers, $7 for certain cocktails and a great price on appetizers. I love the Bruschetta Two Ways and the Mozzarella Fresca. Best Pies has happy hour every day from 2-6 pm. It’s $5 for a big slice of pizza and a beer!

Pianeta Ristorante // tahoefabulous.com
Photo via pianetarestaurant.com

Outdoor Dining: When the weather is nice, I want to eat outside. My favorite restaurant patio is hands down Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar. It’s location on a hill, looking down at the Truckee River and downtown, means it has the best view. The food and drinks are great too, though on the higher end price-wise. For a cheaper option downtown, I like El Toro Bravo. Their patio is covered, so it’s a great option for really sunny days. I like their chile relleno best. Also downtown is Old Town Tap, which has great cocktails, and excellent beer selection and interesting toppings on their wood fired pizza. On the other side of town is Red Truck, which is located in the Truckee Airport. Red Truck is my favorite spot for vegetarian food in Truckee, and they have delicious breakfast bowls too. It’s a lunch counter style place, and you can take your food outside to picnic tables. This is a great spot to bring kids, as there’s a play area, big grassy spot to run around, and you can watch the small planes take off and land.

Photo via ediblerenotahoe.com

Coffee: I like coffee just as much as I like beer, and Truckee has some good spots. I work within walking distance of Coffeebar and Dark Horse Coffee Roasters and I’m a frequent visitor to both. At Coffeebar, I like the iced coffee and any of the baked goods and sitting outside on their patio. At Dark Horse, I HIGHLY recommend their cold brew latte with their homemade vanilla syrup. Pacific Crest Coffee Co. has been roasting and selling coffee for awhile, but their coffee shop is fairly new. It’s tiny, so not really a place to hang out for long, but the coffee is delicious and they have a selection of food to go.

Dark Horse Coffee // tahoefabulous.com
Photo via darkhorsecoffee.com

Dessert: Self serve frozen yogurt is a great way to cap off a long hike or hot bike ride, and Summit Swirl has great options. It’s also open til 10 pm, which is late by Truckee standards. If you’re hanging out on Donner Lake, walk over to the Little Truckee Ice Creamery and have some of Truckee’s only locally made ice cream. I love the Truckee Trails flavor, which is sweet cream and pinenut brittle!

Little Truckee Ice Creamery // tahoefabulous.com
Photo via truckeeicecream.com

Things to Do in Truckee-Tahoe When It’s Raining

Rainy Day Activities for Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com

Ugggghhh, I am not happy about this return to winter! I am ready for long, sunny days at the lake, hikes, mountain biking, and drinking beer on patios. We’re in for quite a stretch of rainy days, but luckily there’s plenty of things to do in Truckee and Tahoe when the weather isn’t great.

Bars, Breweries and Restaurants
Eating and drinking is always a fun indoor activity, and this area has a number of great ones. Here are some of my favorites:

  • Alibi Ale Works Brewery (Truckee & Incline Village): This brewery has awesome beer and something going on most nights of the week – from outdoor movies to trivia to knitting to open mikes to charity bingo to live music, there’s something for almost everyone. Check out my brewery review here!
  • Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar and Moody’s Bistro (Truckee): For a fancier night out in Truckee, these two restaurants are my favorites. Cottonwood has an amazing view of downtown Truckee and Moody’s is perfectly located for bar hopping after dinner. Both restaurants have great food and fun cocktails.
  • West Shore Pizza (Tahoma): This place has my favorite pizza in the area, great beer, and a casual, laid back atmosphere that makes it a great place to hang out while it’s raining.
  • Artemis Lakefront Cafe (South Lake Tahoe): If you want to eat with a lake view while staying dry, I love Artemis Lakefront Cafe in South Lake’s Ski Run Marina. Their whole menu is amazing, but especially their brunch food (Baklava French toast? Come on!). They also have a full bar, so you can get a real Bloody Mary. Artemis has two locations with great food, but only the Lakefront Cafe has brunch and view.
  • South Lake Brewing Company (South Lake Tahoe): Located in the more industrial part of town, South Lake Brewing Company is worth the trek. Their beer is great (be sure to try the Trail Builder Pale if it’s on draft – proceeds from this beer benefit TAMBA). The big warehouse setting means there’s plenty of room for games, well behaved dogs, and large groups.
Rainy Day Activities in Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
Beer at Alibi Ale Works in Truckee and Incline Village.

Indoor Activities
While Tahoe and Truckee are known for their outdoor activities, there are a ton of fun things to do indoors (even ones that don’t involve the casinos!) if you know where to look. Here are some of my favorites.

  • Go see a movie at Tahoe Art Haus (Tahoe City). This awesome theater serves beer, wine, and gourmet popcorn and is locally owned. They have a great mix of blockbusters (the staff all dresses up for Star Wars movies!), indie movies, outdoor films, and local events.
  • High Altitude Fitness (Incline Village) and Blue Granite (Meyers): If it’s too wet to climb outside, there are a couple of great climbing gyms in the area. I’ve spent a lot of time climbing at High Altitude Fitness, which has top roping, auto belay and bouldering, as well as a high end gym feel, including a sauna and smoothie bar. I haven’t actually climbed at Blue Granite yet, but have heard rave reviews from friends who have.
  • If yoga is more your speed, I recommend Tahoe Yoga & Wellness (Truckee), Tahoe Yoga Shala (South Lake Tahoe). I’ve also taken some really fun aerial yoga/aerial arts classes at Inversion Tahoe.
  • There’s frequently great live music in the Truckee-Tahoe area. Some of the best venues to check out are The Divided Sky (Meyers), Crystal Bay Club (Crystal Bay), and the casinos in South Lake Tahoe.
Rainy Day Activities in Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
Indoor Climbing at High Altitude Fitness

Get Outside Anyway
With the right gear and some planning, there are plenty of outdoor activities to do in the rain. Hiking is probably the easiest activity to do in the rain – all you need is a raincoat and some waterproof shoes!

Rainy Day Activities in Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
A sunnier day on the Sagehen Creek Loop Trail

Biking is a little more challenging in the rain, but doable, especially if you stick to roads, gravel and paved trail. Most of the mountain bike trails in Truckee and Tahoe aren’t designed to be ridden in the wet, and will get damaged or destroyed if ridden while muddy. As much as I hate doing it, I stay off the trails until they’ve dried out enough to be safely ridden.

  • My rainy biking gear is pretty similar to hiking, with a rain coat and light baselayer. My raincoat is bright orange, which is great for visibility, but if you have a darker or more neutral color, maybe add a lightweight safety vest for visibility. I skip the rain pants and wear thick, knicker length pants – the Pearl Izumi Sugar Thermal Tights. I also wear full finger gloves when it’s rainy and cold. The Giro LA DND work great for this. There is all sorts of other gear for long road rides in the rain, like shoe covers, under helmet hats, etc., but honestly, my rides in the rain don’t last long enough to need it.
  • My recommended rainy day road rides are the Donner Lake Loop (Truckee), the Olympic Valley to Tahoe City Bike Path (Tahoe City) and exploring the miles of bike paths in South Lake Tahoe.

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

My Recent-ish Favorite Outdoor Films

The organization I work for is hosting the 4th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival Truckee in a couple of weeks. I’ve been involved with WSFF since I moved to Tahoe back in 2010, and this year will be my 9th year helping to run an on tour venue. The Film Festival is one of my favorite events I get to do each year, and one of the main reasons why is that I get an excuse to watch a bunch of awesome outdoor films. Over the years, there’s been an increase of outdoor films focused on more diverse individuals. I love this! There are so many valuable stories that are missed when outdoor and adventure films only focus on super extreme white guys.

In celebration of the increasing diversity of outdoor films and because I’m so excited about our Film Festival (happening Friday April 19th at the Community Arts Center in Historic Downtown Truckee – tickets still available – click here!), I’m going to share some of my favorite outdoor films from the past few years.

Follow Through WSFF
Photo via Wild & Scenic Film Festival

1. Follow Through
People have opinions about skier Caroline Gleich: Inspirational. Gumby. Social media star. Role model. Model masquerading as a mountaineer. At sixteen, she stumbled upon a copy of the cult classic guidebook The Chuting Gallery. Irreverent and wonderfully arbitrary, the guidebook lays out a set of 90 ski mountaineering lines across Utah’s Wasatch Mountains. They were difficult and dangerous. When she first said out loud she wanted to ski them, she was met with laughter. “Maybe it was because I was five feet tall, or I was a little blonde girl, but I remember that clearly — and it didn’t feel good” says Gleich. After a decade building her skills, Gleich set out to complete her vision and become the skier she dreamt of being. “Follow Through” is a story of loss, belonging and desire for respect. In this age of hyperconnectivity, which voices do we choose to hear and which do we ignore?

2. The Mirnavator
Ultra-runners overcome obstacles on every trail. In this film, Force of Nature Mirna Valerio overcomes the negative voices that don’t believe she belongs in the sport.

Photo via Outside Online
Photo via Outside Online

3. Sacred Strides
Bears Ears National Monument is one of the most talked-about public lands under threat, though the dialogue often glosses over how sacred it is to many Native Americans. In March 2018, a group of tribes put their differences aside and came together to run 800 miles to Bears Ears – and to send a message of unity. The Sacred Strides for Healing Prayer Run wove from tribal homelands across the Southwest to Bears Ears. Watch to meet the people who are participating in the public lands conversation with their feet and learn about why this land is so important to them.

4. Super Stoked Surf Mamas of Pleasure Point
Through surfing and a love for the ocean, five women become friends. So when they all become pregnant around the same time, it is natural that the women turn to each other for support and encouragement. Ignoring people who tell them to stop surfing while pregnant, the women decide instead to listen to their own bodies and continue doing what they love — just with some extra precautions and modifications. The women in the film discuss the challenges they face as their bellies grow bigger and their wetsuits no longer fit, but also the joy of being in the water with their unborn child inside them experiencing the ocean together as one.

Photo via Snowbrains
Photo via Snowbrains

5. Evolution of Dreams
What happens when the passion for your dreams fades? Do you just stop? Or do you search for what’s missing and uncover new dreams and goals? Eva and Jackie’s journeys have taken them from regulated ski courses to big mountain skiing which allowed them more freedom. Throughout that journey, they’ve discovered another aspect of skiing, ski mountaineering. In this new discipline, they have to tackle new challenges and conquer new fears. It’s their evolution of dreams.

6. RJ Ripper
Rajesh Magar has been obsessed with bikes since he was a small child growing up in Kathmandu, Nepal. When the other kids were studying, he’d be dreaming about, designing and drawing bikes. As the son of a construction worker and housemaid, however, a bike wasn’t easy to come by. Undeterred, he built one, a clunky Frankenstein, but a mountain bike nonetheless. He started racing, and his drive and raw talent got noticed, leading to a job as a mountain bike guide and a path to professional racing. Today, Nepal’s National Champion is living proof that it pays to stick to your passion, no matter how implausible it seems.

7. Brotherhood of Skiing
Since 1973, the National Brotherhood of Skiers has overcome barriers by bringing soul and smiles to the mountain. Formed during the height of the black power movement, the organization is dedicated to creating a welcoming space for people of color on the slopes and supporting black youth in snowsports. Today, the NBS hosts the largest gathering of black skiers in the United States and represents 53 ski clubs with over 3,000 members across the country.

Photo via Wild & Scenic Film Festival

8. Where the Wild Things Play
Friday night at the local watering hole and … where the ladies at? Answer: BASE jumping from high desert cliffs, performing tricks on slacklines, climbing granite routes, shredding singletrack, skiing backcountry lines and generally leaving you fellas behind. This rowdy ode to female athletes by Krystle Wright leaves no doubt about the state of women in today’s outdoor world: badass.

9. SHIFT
SHIFT is a half-hour documentary about the indigenous youth from Carcross, Yukon who have spent the past 10 years converting traditional trails around their town in to a world-class mountain biking destination — and transforming their community and themselves along the way.

Photo via Inspire Film Festival
Photo via Inspire Film Festival

10. For the Love of Mary
The first time 97-year-old runner George Etzweiler completed the race up the northeast’s tallest peak, Mount Washington, he was 69 years old. Despite having a pacemaker, the State College, Pennsylvania resident continues to compete in the grueling 7.6-mile race up nearly 4,700 feet of paved road, breaking his own record each year for oldest finisher. In addition to his ancient, lucky, green running shorts, Etzweiler carries something else special with him: The memory of his late wife of 68 years, Mary.

Winter Essentials

Winter Essentials // tahoefabulous.com

Winter has finally arrived here in Truckee! We’ve gotten more than 2 feet on the mountains with another 5 feet in the forecast. Living in Tahoe is in general pretty awesome, especially the winter, especially when the snow is deep, fresh and fluffy. But when you live somewhere the winter can last from October until June, the weather can start to drag. There are a few things I’ve found that help make the winter more bearable.

In honor of the first real storm of the season, here are a few of my winter favorites.

Tahoe Daily Snow // tahoefabulous.com

Tahoe Daily Snow: This website, part of the Open Snow network, which “was created by a team of local weather forecasters who are life-long skiers and riders. During the winter, our forecasters write “Daily Snow” updates that will point you toward the best snow conditions. You can also use our mountain-specific forecasts, cams, and snow reports to find the best snow.” The best thing about the Tahoe Daily Snow is that it shares the long range forecast, and the author Bryan Allegretto explains some of the science behind forecasting for weather nerds and powder seekers alike.

Snowboarding Gear for Women // tahoefabulous.com

Outdoor Winter Hobby: If you’re going to live somewhere that gets a lot of winter, you can’t just look forward to summer. You’ve got to find something that you like doing outside. Obviously snowboarding and skiing are big ones (here’s a link to my favorite gear to get you started snowboarding and here’s a link to my friend Kristen’s tips for adult beginner skiers).

Donner Summit Canyon Snowshoe // tahoefabulous.com

If you’re not into either of those, there are a ton of other options. Consider snowshoeing, cross country skiing, backcountry ice skating, skijoring, or basically anything that will get you outside in the winter.

Welcome back to #westseattle

A post shared by Lynn (Tahoe Fabulous) (@tahoefabulous) on

A Good Insulated Mug & Something to Drink: A hot beverage helps me stay warm and happy on cold days. I’m a big fan of the Klean Kanteen wide insulated bottle when I want to be able to throw my bottle around and know it won’t leak and the Klean Kanteen insulated tumbler for easy drinking. My drink of choice is a dirty latte made with coconut milk, Trader Joe’s Chai Latte mix and an espresso blend from Verve Coffee Roasters.

A Workout Routine: Winter days are short, so it’s hard to get out and be active after work. I can’t wait until the weekend to get my endorphin fix, so I need to do something. I have a gym membership at a place with a good weight set up, so I generally focus on weight lifting during the winter. I learned weight lifting through playing sports though out high school, and I did some personal training a few years ago as a refresher so I’m pretty confident in my ability to lift safely on my own. In the past couple of years, I’ve followed/adapted Strong Curves, The New Rules of Lifting for Women, and PHUL. If you’re new to lifting, the Reddit XX Fitness community is awesome, supportive and informative. I’ve also loved taking spin and weight lifting classes in the past.

Winter Essentials // tahoefabulous.com

A Library Card: There’s only one thing I disagree with Leslie Knope about: libraries are amazing. Even in the small town I live in, our library system is awesome and has tons of books available. I read on my Kindle 99% of the time, and my library has lots of e-books available. For 2019, I’m trying to spend less time aimlessly scrolling the internet in bed at night, and e-books from the library have been really helpful in achieving this goal. A few recommendations for this year: The Power by Naomi Alderman, An American Marriage by Tayari Jones, and CIRCE by Madeline Miller.

Battery Packs: When the power goes out, it’s nice to have something that you can use to recharge devices. We have the Goal Zero Yeti 150 Portable Power Station that we mainly use for camping, but it’s come in handy during stormy weather. Smaller rechargeable power sources like this one are nice to have, and it’s great to have something like this AA battery power bank for when the power outage lasts for a few days.

#whiskey and #watercolor

A post shared by Lynn (Tahoe Fabulous) (@tahoefabulous) on

Indoor Hobbies: When the weather gets too bad, I need something to do inside or I go stir crazy. In addition to reading and working out, I’ve spent the last couple of winters practicing water colors, doing basic sewing, and I’ve recently gotten into bullet journaling.

Wood on wood on wood on wood. #misenplace #onionjam #woodpanel #ilovethe70s

A post shared by Lynn (Tahoe Fabulous) (@tahoefabulous) on

A Go To Comfort Meal: There are a few hearty meals that I find myself craving in the winter: Red Curry Chicken from Cravings: Hungry for More by Chrissy Tiegan, Onion Jam from Lodge Cast Iron Nation, Lasagna Soup from A Farm Girl Dabbles, and Sag Paneer from Martha Stewart’s Slow Cooker with homemade naan.

Winter Car Kit: Having a winter safety kit in my car makes me feel a lot less stressed out about driving in the snow. You can buy a pre-made emergency kit, but I always have at least tire chains (Be sure to practice putting them on some time when you’re not on the side of the road in a snow storm.), fingerless mittens that I don’t care about ruining, a foldable shovel, and a piece of flattened out cardboard (for kneeling on). For non emergency car accessories, I love my mitt windshield scraper and lock de-icer. Note: store your lock de-icer outside of your car.

Manini'owali Beach Hawaii // tahoefabulous.com

Plans for a Warm Weather Vacation: They say that planning a vacation is almost as satisfying as actually taking one, and dreaming about (and doing comprehensive spreadsheets for) a trip to a warm destination has gotten me through many long Tahoe winters. Some of my favorite trips include the Big Island, Hawaii, Raja Ampat, Indonesia, and Mendocino, California.

Raja Ampat // tahoefabulous.com

Currently, Greyson and I are trying to decide between the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and the southern end of Baja, Mexico for a fall trip. Any recommendations?

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

My Reno Favorites

While Reno has a reputation for being Las Vegas’s grimier, less fun little sibling, I think it’s an extremely underrated destination. It’s relatively cheap, has amazing access to Lake Tahoe and the Sierra, and has an increasingly good food and bar scene. There are two adjacent neighborhoods where the city is seeing a renaissance – Riverwalk District and MidTown and are my two favorite to visit.

Things to do in Reno // tahoefabulous.com

Riverwalk District:
The Riverwalk District in Downtown Reno is anchored by two things – the historic casinos and the Truckee River. While this is definitely where you want to be if you’re going to gamble, there’s a lot more to do here than play the slots.

For a climbing experience like no other, you can climb at Whitney Peak Hotel at Basecamp. You can boulder inside or climb outside next to the famous “Biggest Little City sign. Also at Whitney Peak Hotel is the concert venue Cargo. Cargo is my favorite size of venue – large enough to attract big-ish names, but small enough that you still feel close to the action. In addition to concerts, they also host events like Zombie Prom, Henry Rollins Slideshow, and wrestling!

Photo by Greyson Howard
Photo by Greyson Howard

The Truckee River runs right through downtown, and Reno has really begun to take advantage of it. In addition to parks, riverfront dining, and pedestrian bridges, there is the Truckee River Whitewater Park, a whitewater kayaker playground with man made and natural features. You’ll often see whitewater kayakers paddling through the rapids, and the Reno River Festival is held every May, with competitions, demonstrations, and a fun street fair.

The Riverwalk District has some great restaurants as well. My favorite Italian restaurant is located here – Campo. It has great pizza and pasta, focusing on local, seasonal ingredients. Their menu varies with what’s in season, but you can’t really go wrong. If the beet salad is on the menu, order that and be sure to check out what their barrel aged cocktail special is. It’s usually something delicious.

#negroni season

A post shared by Lynn (Tahoe Fabulous) (@tahoefabulous) on

For something less fancy, Pho 777 has the best veggie pho I’ve tried so far in Reno. For late night (or early morning!), greasy diner food the Mel’s Drive In in the Sands casino is cheesy, but perfect for what you’re looking for. Also, the Sands will give you a glimpse of the gritty side of Reno.

MidTown:
MidTown Reno is definitely the up-and-coming hipster neighborhood in the city. Greyson and I joke that every time we come there is some new Portland stereotype business that’s opened up – sushi burritos, dog aromatherapy, etc. Some of the original charm still remains. A cupcake shop will share a parking lot with a payday loan store and strip club.

My favorite things to do in MidTown are eat and drink, though there are tons of cute shops and one of the best thrift stores I’ve ever been to, Junkee Clothing Exchange, is located in this district. The Nevada Museum of Art is also here, and it is one of my favorite hidden gems in Reno. It’s only $10 to get in, and they frequently have incredible exhibits with renowned artists. If you’re visiting Reno and have a free evening or afternoon, I highly recommend it!

For breakfast, I frequent Great Full Gardens. This is a great restaurant to visit if you are feeding both vegetarians & meat eaters or adventurous eaters & pickier people – everyone will find something that they like. I almost always get the pupusas, but the liege waffles are a must try and they have the best vegetarian eggs benedict I’ve ever gotten. There are lots of other brunch places in MidTown that look great, but they almost always have long waits, while Great Full Gardens is (inexplicably) less busy.

Photo from Great Full Gardens.
Photo by Great Full Gardens.

For a different kind of breakfast experience, the Brewer’s Cabinet has a “Kegs and Eggs” special on Saturday and Sunday mornings. For $16.95, you get two beers and something off the breakfast menu. It’s a great deal, and I really like their breakfast food, especially the BC scramble.

Photo from The Brewer's Cabinet
Photo by The Brewer’s Cabinet

Moving on to lunch, I like to go to Pinon Bottle Company, a tap house with an extensive beer list that is a great mix of local breweries, less distributed western US breweries, and few beers from far away. After ordering your beer, you can wander next door to Noble Pie Parlor and order delicious pizza. They’ll even deliver it to you back at Pinon, so you can continue enjoying your beer. I love the T-Pane, which has caramelized fennel and onions, sausage, and granny smith apples, though they do have more “normal” pizzas as well.

Noble Pie Midtown
Photo from https://www.facebook.com/noblepiemidtown/

On to dinner and desert! When I want to go to a nicer dinner, I frequently go to Midtown Eats. Like many of Reno’s awesome restaurants, the menu is focused on local and seasonal ingredients, so it changes frequently, but everything I’ve had there has been delicious. They also make great cocktails. Though I am more of a savory treats person, my two favorite sweet things are donuts and ice cream. Simple combines both of these things into an amazing (and incredibly messy) desert. Simple gets donuts, cronuts, cookies, and ice cream from local businesses, and you can create your own ice cream sandwich. They are very messy, don’t get one to go!

Midtown Eats
Photo by Midtown Eats

That’s just scratching the surface of some of my favorite things to do, eat, and drink in just a couple of Reno’s neighborhoods. If you visit Reno, I hope you check out a couple of these places and enjoy them as much as I do!

Beer, Food, and Lodging on Vancouver Island

I realize I’m jumping around some chronologically, but I wanted to collect my Vancouver Island recommendations in one place.

Beer:
First, and most importantly, the beer.

Vancouver Island Breweries // tahoefabulous.com

White Sails Brewing, Nanaimo, BC
We stopped at White Sail Brewing in Nanaimo on our drive from the ferry to Englishman River Falls Provincial Park. The brewery is in an industrial type building, but beachy and full of light on the inside. I enjoyed all of the beers that I tried. Beer descriptions from the breweries, unless obvious. I tried:

Brickyard Beach Red Cream Ale (4.25/5)

Restrained hop bitterness with a balance of light caramel grain and a clean, dry smoothness to finish.

Mount Benson IPA (5/5)
Medium bodied. This beer offers a well balanced clean malty flavour characterized by its distinguished hop bitterness. Delicious aroma of fruit and citrus.

Ridge Ryeder Rye IPA (4/5)
This is a seasonal that’s not always available.

Snake Island Cascadian Dark Ale (3.75/5)
Medium bodied. Full flavoured with hints of chocolate and coffee. A healthy dose of Pacific NW hops to balance the dark malt character. Dark colour profile that drinks like an IPA…. delicious!

Cumberland Brewing Company, Cumberland, BC
Cumberland Brewing Company has a hippie vibe and constantly has lots of high end bikes parked outside. It’s a good fit for the mountain bike focused downtown of Cumberland. We ate there and had a couple of beers. The food was delicious, if a little pricey. I wasn’t super into the the beers they had listed – their beer list leaned towards bitters, wheat beers, sours, etc. The beers we ended up getting were decent, but not on my favorites list. The brewery is definitely worth visiting because the food and atmosphere are great though. I tried Finally IPA (3.75/5) and Tropical Hop ISA (3.75/5.

Beach Fire Brewing, Campbell River, BC
Beach Fire Brewing was my favorite brewery on Vancouver Island. The staff was friendly, the beer was great, and the interior was beautiful. We got there right after it opened on a week day, so it was pretty empty, but it seems like it’s usually a popular place. I am usually an IPA all day person, but at this brewery I noticed the beginning of a trend. I was preferring BC Pale Ales over their IPAs. I tried

Beach Blonde Ale (4.5/5)
Light, refreshing and flavourful. Perfect for a hot day at the beach, or where ever you find yourself soaking up the west coast sun. A clean, light body with a touch of malt sweetness, this balanced brew sports a subtle hop bitterness and flavour. It‘s all yellow polka-dot bikini, without the peroxide.

Ember Red Ale (3.5/5)
A smooth drinking, crimson-coloured Scottish ale. Malt forward with caramel and subtle roasty and chocolate flavours, balanced with mild English hops. It’s perfect for keeping your fire pit glowing.

Hight Tide Pale Ale (5/5)
A hop forward, west coast pale ale with restrained bitterness, but a big hop aroma and flavour. Just as the tides change, hops in this beer may ebb and flow to showcase new and novel varieties. It will always reflect a stoic focus on a new-world hops with rising flavours of citrus, pine and tropical fruits.

Wheelbender Stout (4.25/5)

Gladstone Brewing, Courtenay, BC
We stopped in at Gladstone Brewing to kill time while we waited for our ferry to the Sunshine Coast. We only tried a couple of beers, which were pretty good. The location was really crowded and loud and we were feeling pretty overwhelmed, but would be fun for a rowdy night. I tried

Gladstone IPA (3.5/5)
The Gladstone Straight 6 IPA glints a dark copper, aromas of tropical fruit can be found, but resinous pine is much more prominent. Lightly malted, strong bitterness from West Coast hops is the focus, complimented rather than diffused by bright citrus flavours courtesy of a generous amount of Southern Hemisphere hops. What malt character remains is most apparent after swallowing, where the light sweetness works to hold the bitterness on the tongue.

Gladstone Pilsner (3.5/5)
A bright, clear, golden Lager, the Gladstone Pilsner smells of crisp yeast and lightly spicy hops. Noticeably bitter, the combination of generous hopping and Pilsen malt results in an extremely refreshing brew. A light toasted finish creates a full body that remains dry and does not linger on the tongue.

Lodging
We stayed at three campgrounds and a motel on Vancouver Island. I’d highly recommend the campgrounds we stayed at near Parksville (Hammerfest Trail Network) and Campbell River (trail write up coming soon!). We stayed at Englishman River Falls Provincial Park outside of Parksville and Elk Falls Provincial Park near Campbell River. These parks are quiet, clean, well maintained and CHEAP, especially if you’re used to California State Parks prices.

Camp 8 among the ferns and forest. #toasterroadtrip

A post shared by Greyson Howard (@greyson_goes_outside) on

We stayed at a private campground in Cumberland, which was very close to Cumberland Forest, but not the nicest. The campsites were small and close together and it was hard to find a flat place to pitch our tent. There’s not a lot of other camping options around Cumberland, so I’d recommend finding a motel or vacation rental. There’s a mountain bike focused hostel in Cumberland, The Riding Fool, that seems cool, but we didn’t stay there so I can give it a first hand review. Courtenay and Comox are a very reasonable driving distance as well.

Food
We cooked a lot of meals at our camps, but also tried a fair number of restaurants on Vancouver Island. We were more focused on beer and biking than food, but we ate a few places I can recommend. First up, Lefty’s Fresh Food, where I had probably my favorite meal on the island. I had an omelet with smoked salmon, artichokes and gruyere and parmesan cheese. I still think about that omelet. In Cumberland, I loved Rider’s Pizza. I pretty much never say no to pizza, especially after a bike ride. Finally, we hung out at the Broken Spoke in Courtenay for quite awhile. It’s a bike themed coffee shop with delicious and strong coffee, comfy couches, and plenty of magazines to read.

Oh, and Greyson tried his first poutine while we were on Vancouver Island.
 

Wild & Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe

One of the coolest things I get to do for work every year is putting on the Wild & Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe. WSFF combines award winning environmental and adventure films with the energy of local activism. Each year we choose powerful environmental and adventure films so that attendees are inspired to take further action regarding issues that impact our environment, ourselves and our world.

wsff 2016 email graphic_medium

The Film Festival is the biggest fundraiser for my program, the Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership. SNAP places twenty-eight AmeriCorps members at different conservation agencies and organizations throughout the Sierra Nevada to conduct watershed restoration and monitoring, watershed education, and volunteer recruitment and support. Members serve for 11 months with different conservation organizations and agencies across the Sierra to complete watershed restoration and monitoring, watershed education, and volunteer recruitment and support.

All girl restoration

Since 2007, SNAP Members have

  • Restored more than 13,000 impaired watershed acres
  • Educated more than 155,000 individuals on environmental issues in the Sierra
  • Monitored more than 1,000 sites
  • Recruited more than 29,000 volunteers
  • Contributed more than 425,000 service hours!

Obviously, I think SNAP is an awesome program! In addition to supporting SNAP, the Film Festival is a super fun event. We have a silent auction with prizes like whitewater rafting trips, wine tasting, hotel stays, etc., an activism area where guests can learn about local environmental issues, a backstage VIP area, beer and wine, and a filmmaker Q&A.

Most importantly, the films we show are amazing. Our goal for WSFF is “adventure with a message”. We show cool people doing awesome things in beautiful locations, but the underlying message is about the importance of protecting the places we play and beyond.

Martins-Boat

This year, our first feature film is Martin’s Boat by renowned filmmaker Pete McBride.

“Preeminent conservationist David Brower called him his conscience: in the 1950’s when the Bureau of Reclamation proposed two dams in the Grand Canyon—one at Marble Canyon and the other at Bridge Canyon—the late Martin Litton made sure the Sierra Club didn’t acquiesce. Martin believed the best way for people to understand how important it was to preserve the Grand Canyon was to have them experience this secret world from the river, but not in just any boat. Martin pioneered whitewater dories on the Colorado River in the 1960’s and started a proud tradition of naming the boats after wild places that had been lost or compromised by the hand of man. Now, some 50 years later, America’s open-air cathedral faces continued threats from development and mining and it’s up to all of us to ensure the crown jewel of our National Park system is protected now and for future generations. Martin’s Boat is a film that honors the legacy of Martin Litton and follows the newest boat in the Grand Canyon Dories fleet, the Marble Canyon, on its maiden voyage down the legendary Colorado River through the grandest canyon on Earth.”

Mile-for-Mile2

Our other feature film is Mile for Mile, made by Patagonia and filmmaker James Q. Martin.

“Ultrarunners Krissy Moehl, Jeff Browning and Luke Nelson ran 106 miles through the newly opened Patagonia Park in Chile, to celebrate and highlight Conservacion Patagonica’s efforts to rewild and protect this vast landscape. Patagonia Park, in the Aysén Region of Chile is now open to the public. The park sweeps from the northern ice cap, down to the Baker River and out to the arid borderlands of Argentina. The park’s glaciated peaks, grasslands, beech forests, lakes, rivers and wetlands still boast all of their original species—and the rivers still run free. Patagonia, Inc. has been involved in this project from day one—helping with the first land purchases, sending volunteers down to rip up hundreds of miles of fencing and restore open grasslands, and fighting mega-dam projects on the nearby Baker and Pascua Rivers.”

Noatak

In addition to these two amazing features, we’ll be showing 10 other short films ranging in length from 1 – 12 minutes focusing on climbing, paddling, skiing, hiking, and more, from Yosemite to the Grand Canyon to Antarctica.

We’ll be hosting the 11th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe this Thursday, March 31st in the MontBleu Resort Casino Spa Showroom. If you are in the area, I highly encourage you to attend this event! You can buy tickets ahead of time online here or in person at the Patagonia store in Heavenly Village. We’ll be selling tickets at the door, but there’s a discount if you buy ahead of time. Doors open at 6 pm; films start at 7 pm. Tickets are only $12 for Sierra Nevada Alliance Members.

Thanks for reading my schpiel about my favorite fundraiser for my favorite organization!

 

Beer, Pickles and Donuts: Quick Portland Trip

I went up to visit my college friends for a Halloween cabin party in Washington last weekend. I ended up finding a super cheap flight to Portland, and my friend Michelle, who organized the weekend, happens to live there. I asked her if I could fly in a little early and catch a ride up. Voila, mini trip to Portland!

portland1

I hung out in Portland on Thursday evening after my flight, during the day on Friday, a few hours Sunday night and during the day before my flight on Monday, so I was able to hit up quite a few places while I was there. Mostly, I focused on food and beer – specifically strong & bitter IPAs, pickles and donuts.

portland2

My friends live in a super cute neighborhood (filled with gorgeous fall trees) that’s just a short bike ride/walk away from the awesome Mississippi and Woodlawn neighborhoods. When Michelle wasn’t showing me her favorite spots, I was able to borrow a bike and explore on my own.

portland3

First up, the beer. If you haven’t been living under a rock, you know that the Portland beer scene is one of the best on the planet, especially if you like strong, hoppy IPAs. I was able to check out a few breweries while I was there and I really liked or loved most of what I tried. All descriptions from the breweries’ websites, unless otherwise obvious.

portland4

Burnside Brewing Company

Sweet Heat, 4.9% ABV, 9 IBU. Apricot and Scotch bonnet pepper wheat beer. Spice level varies per batch. 2012 GABF gold medal winner. (4/5 – I don’t normally like fruity beers, but this was great! It reminded me of the spicy dried mangos from Trader Joe’s.)

Burnside IPA, 6.5% ABV, 85 IBU. Malt hop balance, Galena, Cascade, Meridian. Dry hop amarillo. (4.5/5)

Too Sticky to Roll India Red Ale, 6.2% ABV, 78 IBU. Quaffable yet chewy India Red Ale. (4/5)

StormBreaker Brewing

Opacus Stout, As dark and rich as the thick cloud formation it is named after, the light roast coffee flavors with subtle hints of chocolate really warms the soul. This creamy, full body oatmeal stout makes this the perfect beer to enjoy when sitting fireside with a blanket on our patio in those long winter months. (4/5)

Breakside Brewery – my friend Chris works at this brewery (check out the beer and bike blog he has with his girlfriend), and we tried a bunch of great ones that I forgot to record. Just believe me, this brewery is great. We definitely tried an IPA, a couple of sour-er beers and an apple ale.

Matcha Milk Stout, A full bodied stout brewed with milk sugar and matcha. Grassy and lightly bitter with a lingering sweetness. (4.75/5 This one came recommended by my friend. It’s not one I would have chosen on my own, but was probably my favorite beer I had this weekend.)

Ecliptic Brewing – the bartender at this bar was super friendly and gave me a ton of recommendations. Unfortunately, I didn’t visit until my last afternoon, so I didn’t get to check any of them out on this trip.

portland5

Canopus IPA, The supergiant Canopus shines in the southern constellation Carina.  Brewed with a special blend of malts for a smooth body and a dry finish, Canopus IPA pays homage to the second brightest star in the night sky.  Sterling hops impart a crisp bitterness, and dry hopping with Simcoe and Centennial completes the ale with tropical and citrusy hop flavor. (3.75/5)

Trans Pacific Pilsner, This collaboration was brewed with The Garage Project Brewery in New Zealand. We met up with Jos during Oregon Brewers fest to craft this American/New Zealand Pilsner. This is a very hop forward pilsner with a dank hop aroma from Simcoe and NZ Nelson Sauvin hops. The malt flavors are creamy with a very crisp finish. (4.5/5)

Altair Fresh Hop Ale, Brewed to celebrate the annual Hop harvest! Altair a bright star in the Constellation Aquila the Eagle. Fresh Amarillo Hops were used making this beer. A light biscuit malt character is balanced with wonderful aromas of orange and slight tropical fruit. This beer was dry hopped in the fermenter. It’s a classic American pale ale! (4.75/5 The bartender found some of the last of this – I’m so glad I got to try it!)

Orbiter IPA, Orbiter IPA unites a constellation of “C” hops (Cascade, Centennial, Chinook and Columbus) to create a formidable IPA. Bright and  citrusy hop flavors shine in a medium body with caramel malt character. Dry hopped to amplify the hop aroma and flavor. (4/5)

I also had some amazing lemon lavender cider at Bushwhacker Cider. Lavender is one of my favorite flavors, and it was delicious in the lemon cider. It would be perfect for a hot sunny day on a patio – or, you know, the rainy cold evening we were actually experiencing. Bushwhackers seemed like a pretty cool place, but it was almost totally empty. We took advantage of that by hogging the free shuffleboard table the whole night.

I managed to fit in a few things other than brewery hopping. I had phenomenal short rib kimchi quesadillas at the KOi Fusion food truck.

portland6

I bought some adorable book-related limited edition prints and hipster coloring books at Reading Frenzy. I checked out the ReBuilding Center – I wanted to bring home a souvenir, but couldn’t fit an antique light fixture into my carry on.

portland7

I had three pickle plates (homemade and at Burnside & StormBreaker) and fried pickles (at Breakside).

portland8

And most importantly, I finally tried a Voodoo Doughnut, and Old Dirty Bastard is the way to go. I also tried a couple of donuts at Blue Star Donut. I loved the blueberry bourbon basil.

portland9

Finally, there was this creepy Doll Asylum for Halloween. I did not go in.

portland10

I had an awesome time in Portland, and I can’t wait to go back and visit more breweries. Maybe I’ll even get a hike in!

 

My Favorite Women-Led Adventure Films

Hilary Oliver at The Gription wrote a great post today called “Why are there so few women’s adventure films?” You should definitely go read the post, but she started it by saying:

“It’s been a thing for a while now, this underrepresentation of women in adventure films. Why?It seems we’re not really making them, or at least not enough of them. And why is that? Well, it’s complicated—but the solution might come down to you and me.”

And concluded with:

“Maybe it’s time for us to simply start telling those stories we see that need to be told—to stop wondering why someone else isn’t doing it, and just do it ourselves.”

The issues of under- and negative representation of women is something that is very important to me, and Hilary’s post inspired me to put together a short list of my favorite adventure films that are made by, feature, and/or star awesome women!

  1. The Little Things by Marie-France Roy & Darcy Turenne

The Little Things

I mentioned this film in the roundup of my favorite films of the Wild & Scenic Film Festival. “Follow professional snowboarders who have chosen to be outspoken and make positive changes towards a sustainable environment. This film is an initiative taken on by one of snowboarding’s most influential riders, Marie-France Roy, in hopes of inspiring others towards sustainability through inspirational speakers, positive ideas, and leading a healthy lifestyle. They keep it positive and showcase some of the little things that people can do to contribute to positive changes for the future of our environment.” The Little Things also happens to be the feature film at the Sierra Nevada Alliance’s 10th Annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe. Get your tickets today!

  1. Push It by Jen Randall

I had a chance to see this film at last year’s Wild & Scenic Film Festival (honestly, where I end up seeing most of my adventure movies). I had just signed up for a beginning climbing class, and this film was totally inspiring. Push It flashes between two friends preparing for their first ever big wall climb and the stories of and advice from professional women climbers. “Two women prepare for their first ever big wall – El Capitan in Yosemite, which goes far from smoothly from start to finish. Along the way, we visit climbing heroines for inspiration – and we overcome broken bones, awful weather, a lack of funds and several crisis of confidence.

womens films 2

  1. Georgena Terry by Amanda Zackem

This is super short, but well worth watching. A Terry saddle is next on my bike wishlist! “This short documentary is about Georgena Terry, founder of Terry Bicycles. Terry revolutionized the women’s biking industry by creating a frame specific to a woman’s body. This is the story of how she got her start and the challenges within the women’s biking movement.

  1. Nobody’s River by Amber Valenti, Skip Armstrong & Wazee Motion Pictures

Womens Films 3

Photo via nobodysriver.org/

Another film I recommended earlier this year, Nobody’s River combines adventure, gorgeous scenery, female friendship and epic dance offs. “Four women journey down one of the world’s last free flowing rivers of the world and discover raw beauty, industrial wastelands, devastating loss, and unbridled joy.”

  1. Solstice by Andy Hofman


I like my runs to be well under 5 miles, but I couldn’t help but be inspired by Ashley Lindsey as she runs 100 miles in the Western States Endurance Race. I may even run 6 miles someday! “1 Woman. 1 Day. 100 Miles. And an attempt to prove that “impossible” is just a word. Ashley Lindsey’s mission to finish the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains—the world’s oldest and most prestigious trail race from Squaw Valley to Auburn—is documented in this film where she batters bitter cold, stifling heat, and her own mental and physical limitations along the way.

These are just a few of the adventure films made by and featuring awesome women that often fly under the radar. What are some of your favorites?