Mountain Biking Hirschman Trail – Nevada City, California

Hirschman Trail, Nevada City, Ca // tahoefabulous.com

I was back in Nevada City this week to do Site Visits at some of my AmeriCorps host sites. The weather down in the foothills was perfect – sunny and low 70s! While I have been complaining about the lack of snow in Tahoe, I certainly don’t mind basking in the sun!

Hirschman 2

Greyson lived in Nevada City for awhile a few years ago, and he remembered a short, easy trail that’s a just quick ride out of town that he rode a few times. We brought bikes and planned to do the ride after I finished up with work on Thursday. We pedaled up Broad Street from the Emma Nevada House, turned left on Highway 49 and were at the trailhead in less than a mile.

Trail Map via Strava

I was excited to see that the trail was the Hirschman Trail, a project of Bear Yuba Land Trust, one of my AmeriCorps host sites! The trail is pretty easy, both technically and exertion wise, with only about 500 feet of elevation gain over the 4.8 mile round trip trail. The trail is really well marked with signs letting you know how far you’ve come, and honoring the supporters and volunteers that keep the trail in great shape.

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The trail is all on hard packed dirt, though it was pretty covered in pine needles when I rode it, as it goes mainly through the forest. There are a few spots where you pop out and parallel Highway 49, but that’s just a couple of short sections. There are a few tight switchbacks along the way, but nothing overly difficult. This is a great trail for a beginner or someone looking to do a short, mellow ride after work or while on vacation. Another highlight is Hirschman’s Pond where some of my other AmeriCorps Members are conducting frog surveys and doing other wildlife tracking. Early morning and evening riders might glimpse some local wildlife!

Hirschman 5

After our ride, Greyson and I got Mammoth Brewing Company’s IPA 395 and dinner at Matteo’s Public. That beer is great, but be careful! They’re strong! PS It’s National AmeriCorps Week! Be sure to thank a volunteer, and thanks to those who’ve participated in National Service!

Hirschman 6

Trail Stats:
Location: Cement Hill Road, Nevada City, California
Mileage: 4.8 miles
Elevation Gain: <500 feet
Difficulty: Beginner

My Favorite Women-Led Adventure Films

Hilary Oliver at The Gription wrote a great post today called “Why are there so few women’s adventure films?” You should definitely go read the post, but she started it by saying:

“It’s been a thing for a while now, this underrepresentation of women in adventure films. Why?It seems we’re not really making them, or at least not enough of them. And why is that? Well, it’s complicated—but the solution might come down to you and me.”

And concluded with:

“Maybe it’s time for us to simply start telling those stories we see that need to be told—to stop wondering why someone else isn’t doing it, and just do it ourselves.”

The issues of under- and negative representation of women is something that is very important to me, and Hilary’s post inspired me to put together a short list of my favorite adventure films that are made by, feature, and/or star awesome women!

  1. The Little Things by Marie-France Roy & Darcy Turenne

The Little Things

I mentioned this film in the roundup of my favorite films of the Wild & Scenic Film Festival. “Follow professional snowboarders who have chosen to be outspoken and make positive changes towards a sustainable environment. This film is an initiative taken on by one of snowboarding’s most influential riders, Marie-France Roy, in hopes of inspiring others towards sustainability through inspirational speakers, positive ideas, and leading a healthy lifestyle. They keep it positive and showcase some of the little things that people can do to contribute to positive changes for the future of our environment.” The Little Things also happens to be the feature film at the Sierra Nevada Alliance’s 10th Annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe. Get your tickets today!

  1. Push It by Jen Randall

I had a chance to see this film at last year’s Wild & Scenic Film Festival (honestly, where I end up seeing most of my adventure movies). I had just signed up for a beginning climbing class, and this film was totally inspiring. Push It flashes between two friends preparing for their first ever big wall climb and the stories of and advice from professional women climbers. “Two women prepare for their first ever big wall – El Capitan in Yosemite, which goes far from smoothly from start to finish. Along the way, we visit climbing heroines for inspiration – and we overcome broken bones, awful weather, a lack of funds and several crisis of confidence.

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  1. Georgena Terry by Amanda Zackem

This is super short, but well worth watching. A Terry saddle is next on my bike wishlist! “This short documentary is about Georgena Terry, founder of Terry Bicycles. Terry revolutionized the women’s biking industry by creating a frame specific to a woman’s body. This is the story of how she got her start and the challenges within the women’s biking movement.

  1. Nobody’s River by Amber Valenti, Skip Armstrong & Wazee Motion Pictures

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Photo via nobodysriver.org/

Another film I recommended earlier this year, Nobody’s River combines adventure, gorgeous scenery, female friendship and epic dance offs. “Four women journey down one of the world’s last free flowing rivers of the world and discover raw beauty, industrial wastelands, devastating loss, and unbridled joy.”

  1. Solstice by Andy Hofman


I like my runs to be well under 5 miles, but I couldn’t help but be inspired by Ashley Lindsey as she runs 100 miles in the Western States Endurance Race. I may even run 6 miles someday! “1 Woman. 1 Day. 100 Miles. And an attempt to prove that “impossible” is just a word. Ashley Lindsey’s mission to finish the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains—the world’s oldest and most prestigious trail race from Squaw Valley to Auburn—is documented in this film where she batters bitter cold, stifling heat, and her own mental and physical limitations along the way.

These are just a few of the adventure films made by and featuring awesome women that often fly under the radar. What are some of your favorites?

Trail Report: Wendin Canyon from Tahoe Donner, Truckee, California

There is an awesome new trail in the Truckee area! The Truckee Donner Land Trust has been steadily working on a 23-mile, multi-use trail that will circle Donner Lake.

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Currently, there’s 7.2 miles completed, and the trail accesses some of the best views in the Truckee area – the Sierra Crest, Mount Rose and Donner Lake. Eventually, the trail will connect with other area trails, including the Pacific Crest Trail and Hole in the Ground trail. Additionally, there is an offshoot access trail called Wendin Way Trail through Johnson Canyon (sometimes known as Negro Canyon) that begins and ends near the Donner Lake exit north of I-80. With this less than stellar winter we’ve been having, I’ve gotten a chance to ride it a couple of times lately.

Map via Google Maps
Map via Google Maps

Both times, we shuttled the ride for a mostly downhill trip, leaving a car parked at Donner Lake, and driving our bikes up to the Tahoe Donner Glacier Way Trailhead. You can also park your second car at the trailhead parking lot at the bottom of Johnson Canyon, just off the Donner Lake I-80 ext. Don’t forget keys for both cars!

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The trail starts with a steady but not steep climb of 300 feet over almost two miles. Due to the fact that we were riding in February at above 7,500 feet, we had to push our bikes through a few slushy snow patches on the way up, and across a small snow field when the trail flattened out.There are a few offshoot trails, but just stay on the main wide trail until you see a sign directing you to turn left on to the Donner Lake Rim Trail. We were rewarded after the climb with sweeping views of the Sierra Crest and Donner Lake once we made it through.

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Now we get to the fun part! The rest of the trail is downhill, speedy single track. There are some rocky sections at the top and again at the bottom, but the trail is mainly nice dirt, and not the sandy decomposed granite that I’m used to riding in Tahoe! There are some sharp switchbacks and slightly exposed sections, but I would classify the ride as totally doable for intermediate riders, but still exciting enough to be fun for advanced riders. Note: there were a couple of big trees down when we rode this last weekend (2/16/2015), so be on the lookout for obstacles!

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After about 700 feet of descent at 3.5 miles from the start, there is a big metal sign at the Donner Lake Rim Trail/Wendin Way intersection. Go left onto the Wendin Way trail and continue your descent for another 1.5 miles and 500 feet through Johnson/Negro Canyon. I had so much fun on this part of the trail! Wendin Way Trail will spit you out back at the trailhead parking lot, or, like we did, you can continue down the paved Donner Lake Road to Donner Lake, where we left a car.

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Map and Elevation via Strava

The Donner Lake Rim Trail and Wendin Way Trail are my favorite trails I’ve ridden in Truckee so far. The Truckee Donner Land Trust does an amazing job with their trail building. Though this is a multi-use trail, it feels like it’s designed for mountain bikes. I felt like I could build up speed without losing control. The trails have enough rocks to feel challenging without being a miles-long rock garden sufferfest. I could glide through (most of) the switchbacks. I love that the Truckee Donner Land Trust is preserving wonderful places, but also making them so accessible for people to enjoy! (They also own the Webber Falls property). They are a wonderful group, doing a lot for the area, and they can use your support, through donations or by enjoying and respecting their properties. I hope you get a chance to enjoy them. I know I will be back on the Donner Lake Rim Trail!

 Donner Rim Trail Wendin Way Trail // tahoefabulous.com

Trail Stats:
Location: Glacier Way, Truckee, California
Mileage: 4.7 miles
Elevation gain: 5581 feet
Difficulty: Moderate

Climbing at Smith Rock in Oregon

At the beginning of the month, Greyson and I took a road trip up to Bend, Oregon. I’ve already written about the beer and biking, but we did one other main activity while we were there: climbing and camping at Smith Rock State Park.

Smith Rock State Park, Bend, Oregon // tahoefabulous.com

The Oregon State Parks website says this about Smith Rock:

If you enjoy scenic views of deep river canyons or rock climbing, Smith Rock State Park is the place for you. There are several thousand climbs in the park. More than a thousand are bolted routes. We also offer miles of hiking and mountain biking trails. Along your trip through the canyon, you might see golden eagles, prairie falcons, mule deer, river otter and beaver.

Smith Rock is a major rock climbing destination and the birth place of North American sport climbing. The Mountain Project describes the climbing at Smith Rock as:

“…Oregon’s premier rock climbing destination, and one of the best sport climbing areas in the United States. This world-renowned sport climbing mecca has more than once been at the focal point of the climbing world. Extensive development took place in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s by locals and international climbers alike, who put up scores of classic climbs on the tuff and basalt cliffs; development continues to this day with new moderates and cutting-edge routes going up each year. Ranging from classic beginner routes to hardcore testpieces on a wide variety of rock, there is truly something here for everyone. Although best known for its sport climbing traditional climbers can find plenty to be excited about here as well.

Located in the high desert in central Oregon, Smith Rock State Park’s cliffs and hillsides take a commanding presence over the surrounding terrain. The main cliffs are made of volcanic welded tuff, and surrounding bands of columnar basalt lie above the winding Crooked River…the prominent walls overlooking the Crooked River are home to many of Smith Rock’s most famous routes, but for those seeking some solitude and adventure there is plenty to be found on the back side or among the basalt columns in the Upper and Lower gorge. Monkey Face, perhaps the park’s most recognizable feature, sits proudly on the back side of Smith Rock with spectacular views of the Cascade Mountains and the arid landscape below.”

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Our first night in Bend we stayed in a vacation rental downtown, as we weren’t sure how late we would be getting in, and wanted to avoid setting up camp in the dark. The other three nights, we camped in the walk-in only camping at Smith Rock State Park, about a half an hour outside of Bend, and a quick walk to the climbing area and Crooked River. All of the camping is walk in only, and $5 per person (which includes hot showers and nice bathrooms!). It’s only about a two minute walk from the parking to the camping area, so carrying stuff from the car was really easy. There’s no fires or cooking at the campsites, so we just left all of the cooking implements (food, stove, pots & pans, etc.) in the car to make it even easier. The camping spots are just flat areas spread beneath the juniper trees, so pick your favorite and set up camp! This is definitely one of the best State Park campgrounds I’ve ever stayed in.

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Smith Rocks from the campsite at the state park.

One of the first things we did when we arrived in Bend was head to a gear shop and pick up a guidebook for climbing at Smith Rock. The friendly and helpful staff at Mountain Supply recommended Falcon Guides Rock Climbing Smith Rock State ParkWe started pouring over it while back at our campsite cooking dinner. Luckily, we a friendly local overheard us chatting and gave us a ton of great advice for fun climbs at our skill level.

We ended up spending our day of climbing on the campground side of the river at the Rope de Dope block. This particular block had a number of fun top rope climbs within my range (occasionally 5.10a) and access to the top anchors via a rope ladder. Greyson ended up leading up a 5.7 sport route to get to the top and set up our toprope (note: Smith Rock is known for HIGH first anchors), but it was nice to have the option.

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Greyson getting our gear set up at Rope de Dope block

Though we waited for the sun to come out and melt the frost before we headed down to climb, Rope de Dope was in the shade. It was February in the high desert, so we were dealing with freezing cold fingers. I spent more time trying to warm up my painfully cold hands in the sunny spots down by the river than climbing.

I made it up 5.7 How Low Can You Go (though it felt like a hard 5.7 for a warm up!). I flailed around quite a bit on the crux of 5.9 Shamu, but I persevered after a couple of attempts and made it to the top! The rocks of this area are very different than the Sierra granite that I’m used to, so that was fun to experience. There were a lot more little pockets for finger holds, but I didn’t realize how much I relied on smearing my feet on the granite until I was up there sliding all over the face of Rope de Dope.

After my successful ascent of Shamu, I was physically done and mentally exhausted. Climbing is hard work! I can’t wait to get into better shape so I can spend longer days climbing. Greyson agreed with me, so we packed up our gear and headed on the hike back up to camp. I was worried the climb out of the valley would be miserable, but it wasn’t too bad! Plus we had gorgeous views of Smith Rock, the Crooked River, and a clear look at the Three Sisters way off in the distance to distract us.

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Obviously, one of the best parts of climbing is the meal you eat immediately following. You’re usually hungry enough that a peanut butter sandwich or cheese quesadilla you packed tastes like the nectar of the gods. But since were were on vacation, we decided to live it up and head into Bend and really feast! We planned on hitting up an Indian restaurant that Greyson had been to before, but fate intervened and they weren’t open for the early bird special dinner we were looking for. I was freezing and hangry, so we stopped in a coffee shop to figure out our next step, and the barista recommended Wild Rose Northern Thai Eats – saying it was the best Thai restaurant she’s ever tried. She was right! I love Thai food and living in the Pacific Northwest spoiled me, but this was the most amazing Thai food I’ve ever tasted. Since the menu is all food from northern Thailand, the Thai restaurant staples like pad thai and hangover noodle that I’m used to seeing were not on the menu. We ordered curried basil noodles off the menu, and something off the (huge) specials board that the waitress recommended. Everything we ate was so good! Everything everyone around us ordered looked so good! I can’t recommend this place enough – it’s a little different than the typical Thai restaurant, but unique in the most delicious way.

 

Bend: The Beer

So I’ve already waxed poetically about the beer at Crux Fermentation Project, but I tried A LOT of beers when we were in Bend. Here are some of the highlights:

Bend: The Breweries // tahoefabulous.com

After purchasing a bike lock and rear flashers for our Bend Ale Trail bike tour at The Hub Cyclery, we rode over to 10 Barrel Brewing Company* for dinner and beer. Despite it being fairly early on a Wednesday, the place was packed! We headed for the bar to wait for our table, where I ordered the Apocalypse IPA (I ranked it 4/5) and Greyson got the India-Style Session Ale (3/5). We were seated at the long, bar-style community table where we got to eavesdrop on lots of interesting/awkward conversations. I also had a P2P American Stout (4.5/5).

Bend beer 2

*10 Barrel Brewing Company was recently bought by AB-InBev, so it’s technically no-longer a craft brewery, if that matters to you.

We then biked over to McMenamins Old Saint Francis School, a converted Catholic schoolhouse from the 1930’s. There’s a bar, restaurant, hotel, movie theater, and even a soaking pool! I only found out about all of the other amenities after I was back home, but I definitely want to check out the pool on my next trip to Bend. I had the Star Trip IPA (which did not have an entry on Untappd! So, honestly I don’t remember how much I like the beer, other than it was not my favorite, but I enjoyed it.) and Greyson got the Hammerhead American Pale Ale (1.5/5 – did not like it!). We called it a night after McMenamins after the long drive and headed back to the condo we stayed in our first night there.

We spent Thursday afternoon at Crux Fermentation Project, and that was our only brewery that day.

On Friday, we had a leisurely morning around camp (I finally tried a Picky Bar and really liked it! Got to love that there are getting to be more and more soy-free bars out there!), and took on the Deschutes River Trail via mountain bike. It only seemed appropriate to visit the Deschutes Brewery after!

Deschutes Brewery, Bend, OR // tahoefabulous.com

My favorite six pack that I can get fairly easily in California is Deschutes’ Fresh Squeezed IPA, and Greyson waits all year for Red Chair NWPA, so we were excited to try our favorites and more at the source. In addition to Fresh Squeezed and Red Chair, we had samplers of Bachelor Bitter (3.5), In Version Experimental Inversion IPA (3/5), Obsidian Nitro Stout (3.5/5) and Chasin’ Freshies. I’d never had Red Chair on draft, and I really liked it, it may have been my favorite out of the ones we tried there! We also split a pint of Deschutes Black Butte Porter (my favorite porter!) at Crow’s Feet Commons later – because who can resist getting a beer at a bar in a bike shop?

We grabbed dinner Friday night at a mediocre Mediterranean restaurant – nothing worth writing about, but there I was able to order a happy hour pint of Boneyard Beer Company RPM IPA (4/5). This brewery had come recommended by Emily and the bartender at Crux, so I was excited to try it out. I really enjoyed it, and I wish we could have made it to the actual brewery during our time there. Next time!

We decided to hit one more spot on the Bend Ale Trail before heading back to our campground out at Smith Rock. We walked over to Bend Brewing Company and ordered pints of Elk Lake IPA (4/5) and Metolius Golden Ale (3/5). I liked the Metolius Golden Ale way more than I usually like that style of beer.

After climbing in the cold on Saturday morning/early afternoon, we headed into town famished and ready for more beer. We had a late lunch at the most amazing Thai restaurant I’ve ever been to – Wild Rose (this place deserves its own post!), where I had a pint of 3 Sisters American Red Ale (4/5) from Wild Ride Brew, just down the road in Redmond, Oregon.

Our final stop on the Bend brewery tour was Silver Moon Brewing, my second favorite brewery of the trip. Also, the brewery was located across the street from a DONUT TRUCK which was, unfortunately, closed both times we drove by. Next time. We sat at the bar, and the friendly bartenders poured us samples of HopNob IPA (4.5/5 – the only beer in my Top 8 NOT from Crux!), Voodoo Dog American Amber (4/5), Get Sum American Pale Ale (4/5), IPA 97 (2.5/5) and Mango Daze ISA (3.5/5) which was surprisingly good for a fruity beer!

Bend is a perfect destination for the outdoorsy, the beer lover, and, especially, for those who fall in both categories. We honestly just scratched the surface of breweries in the Bend area. I can’t wait to go back and try all of the other beers from the breweries I didn’t get to visit. And (honestly), probably spend another day at Crux and Silver Moon!

P.S. We also stopped by Sierra Nevada Brewing Company on our way up north!

Sierra Nevada Brewing, Chico, CA // tahoefabulous.com

 

Mountain Biking the Deschutes River Trail

Mountain Biking the Deschutes River Trail, Bend, Oregon // tahoefabulous.com

Greyson and I brought A LOT of gear on this road trip to Bend, because we weren’t sure how the weather was going to be. We brought skis/snowboards, camping gear, hiking gear, snowshoes, mountain bikes, climbing gear and swimsuits! We ended up not using all of it, but we made the most of what we could do.

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One thing I was really looking forward to was mountain biking in Bend. It’s one of the (many) outdoor activities Bend is known for, and I was excited to give it a try. As I’m feeling fairly out-of-shape bike wise, I wanted to try a trail that wasn’t going to be too difficult technically or exertion wise.

We stopped in an awesome bike store/beer & wine bar/coffee shop, Crow’s Feet Commons, and picked up a Bend bike trail map to add to Greyson’s “map library” (aka the overflowing side pockets in the Toaster). We decided on the Deschutes River Trail, as it was easily accessible and close to town and rated as beginning/intermediate in both terrain and exertion.

Map via Google Maps
Map via Google Maps

We jumped on the trail a few miles out of town (directions here) from a dirt parking lot right next to the river. After a few minutes of fire road riding we found ourselves on a gorgeous dirt trail that paralleled the Deschutes. Unfortunately, despite the supposed “beginner/intermediate” nature of this trail, we fairly quickly arrived on some technical rocky sections. I consider myself a strong intermediate rider, but I had to get off and walk a couple of these sections, especially as I was not expecting them! However, the rocky sections were over in less than a quarter mile, and the rest of the trail (that we rode) was smooth sailing – definitely beginner.

Trail Map and Elevation Profile via Strava
Trail Map and Elevation Profile via Strava

For me, the best feature of the Deschutes River Trail was the awesome packed dirt. I’m used to the decomposed granite that turns to sand that the Tahoe area trails are “famous” for, so this forest soil was a welcome change! I felt like I couldn’t slide out if I tried (note: I am sure that is not true). The trail meanders along with the Deschutes, giving gorgeous views of the river and the strange lava beds the area is famous for. The Deschutes is also a popular whitewater kayaking destination, so I’m sure that in certain times of year, you can watch people shooting the rapids.

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The trail heads south from Bend and travels about thirteen miles south to Sun River, so you could definitely make a day of it for a longer, 26 mile ride. We ended up just riding about a 9 mile out-and-back section of the trail, but I imagine most of the trail is similar. It was muddy in spots, so be sure to check conditions and practice good trail etiquette if you’re riding in the winter or spring. Additionally, the trail is mixed use, and used considerably by hikers and bikers, so be sure to keep your speed under control to avoid user conflicts.

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Overall, I enjoyed this trail. Though I didn’t experience the whole thing, I’d rank the section we rode as “beginner” with a short “intermediate to advanced” but easily walkable section on the technical side of things, and definitely “easy” for exertion. I can’t wait to get back to Bend and ride the whole Deschutes River Trail, as well as trying out some of the harder trails.

 

Try This Beer: Crux Fermentation Project in Bend Oregon

I tried A LOT of beers while I was in Bend. In fact, brewery visiting was one of my top 3 motivations for this semi-spontaneous road trip. Most of the beers I tried ranged from good to excellent, but one brewery blew all of the rest out of the water: Crux Fermentation Project

Crux Fermentation Project Bend Oregon // tahoefabulous.com

At Crux, I tried eight beers, and seven of those beers were the seven best beers I had in Bend. And the other one was still delicious, just not my favorite type of beer. In addition to the amazing beers, the staff was super friendly and generous with their time and their pours.

One bartender (whose name I didn’t get) asked us which beers we liked the most, then poured us another couple of samplers he thought we would like and needed to try. He also recommended several other breweries to try, and we took his suggestions seriously on our list of places to visit.

Here’s the list of the beers I tried (all descriptions from Crux’s website) and my rankings at the time according to Untappd.

Prowell Springs Pre-Prohibition Lager: 5 out of 5

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Sugar Daddy American Pale Ale: 5 out of 5

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Outcast American IPA: 5 out of 5

“The name “Outcast” gives a nod to the origin of the Galaxy hops used. The hops came from Australia, which was originally populated by English “Outcasts” or outlaws.”

Nitro Stout: 5 out of 5

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Half Hitch Imperial IPA: 5 out of 5

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2014 Tough Love Imperial Stout: 4.5 out of 5

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Bert Scotch Ale: 5 out of 5

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On the Fence American IPA: 5 out of 5

“It’s not a Pale and it’s not an IPA – it’s “on the fence”. A solid malt backbone with significant hop flavors and aromas (Centennial and Citra), medium alcohol and bitterness.”

We ended up buying a half growler (in this awesome double walled growler from Hydro Flask) of the On the Fence to take back and enjoy at our campsite. We even stopped by on our way out of town and filled up the growler with Half Hitch and bought a couple of bottles of Outcast! We weren’t kidding around with our Crux Fermentation Project love.

 

Hiking Alamere Falls – Bolinas, California

I finally made it out to one of my Bay Area bucket list destinations – Alamere Falls. Alamere is a rare California tidefall, a waterfall that streams directly onto the beach. It’s one of only two in northern California!

Alamere Falls Hike, Bolinas, California // tahoefabulous.com

We approached Alamere Falls from the south on the Coastal Trail outside of Bolinas, California. The trail is about 8 miles round trip, and fairly flat and easy, aside from the unmaintained trail to the top of the falls and the sketchy climb to the beach below the falls.

Trail Map via Strava
Trail Map via Strava

I had never been to Alamere, and Greyson hadn’t been in years, so we were surprised by the amount of people who were doing the fairly long hike on a Sunday. We had to park about a half mile away from the trailhead due to the amount of cars in the parking lot and along the road. We also were stopped several times before we made it onto the trail by people asking if “this is the trail to the waterfall?”

I’m not sure if it is always that busy on weekends or if it was exacerbated by some outside cause, like the gorgeous weather or being featured in a magazine or newspaper article. We saw several hundred people over the course of the ~3.5 hours we spent on the trail and on the beach. If you’re looking for a relaxing, people-free adventure, this may not be the hike for you, or be sure to time it on a week day during an off time.

Crowds at the top of Alamere Falls
Crowds at the top of Alamere Falls

Despite the many people (many who lacked basic hiking etiquette – we saw tons of dogs in the dog-free wilderness area, people hiking while blasting music, and other rude trail behavior), the Alamere Falls hike was totally worth it for us. The tide was way in, so there wasn’t much beach and we were dodging the waves, but the view of the waterfall falling into the waves was incredible!

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Because there were so many people and loose dogs running around, the steep and loose climb down to the beach and back to the trail was extra sketchy. If you’re not sure-footed and used to scrambling, I’d recommend staying on the top of the cliff and enjoying the still amazing view of the falls from above.

Elevation Profile via Strava
Elevation Profile via Strava

Though fairly long, the trail is mostly flat and not technical, so it ends up being a fairly easy hike to the top of the falls and back. There are great ocean views on some sections of the trail, and once the haze cleared out, we could see back to the skyline of San Francisco. It should definitely be on your Bay Area Bucket List!

Can you spot the SF skyline?
Can you spot the SF skyline?

My Favorite Restaurants in Truckee

Truckee Restaurants // tahoefabulous.com

My Favorite Restaurants in South Lake Tahoe is one of my most popular posts, so I thought I’d do a similar post for another place that I frequent – Truckee! Greyson lives in Truckee, so I end up spending a lot of time up there. Though I love South Lake Tahoe, I think of Truckee as South Lake’s slightly more charming neighbor to the north. The Truckee River flows right through town and is parallel to Truckee’s adorable historic downtown. These choices might be a little more well known that my South Lake favorites, but they’re great and I’ve hopefully exposed a few (slightly) hidden gems.

Best Happy Hour:

Pianeta: This upscale Italian restaurant has a fantastic happy hour on weekdays from 5:00 – 6:30. You have to sit at the bar, and it can get crowded, so I suggest showing up right at 5:30. They have $3 microbrews, $5 house wine, $5 well cocktails, $6 martinis and a few other cocktails on special. They also have happy hour appetizers that are generously sized – we often go in groups and split a few plates. I love the bruschetta duo and the caprese.

Best Mexican:

Taco’s Jalisco: South Lake is definitely lacking in the Mexican food arena, but Truckee delivers! Truckee has several great Mexican restaurants, and Taco’s Jalisco is by far my favorite. I love their veggie burrito, burrito bowls, and chicken tacos.

Best Hipster Coffee Shop:

Dark Horse Coffee Roasters: I’ve mentioned that I can be a bit of a coffee snob, and I love Truckee’s newest coffee shop! It’s a great place to hang out with a slightly funky vibe. Dark Horse is not at all style over substance – all the coffee I’ve had is to die for, the homemade chai is delicious, and they even do their own vanilla syrup. There’s also a Dark Horse in San Diego.

 

Dark Horse Coffee Roasters – Truckee, California
Dark Horse Coffee Roasters – Truckee, California

Best Sandwiches:

Full Belly Deli: This place is pretty well known, but for a good reason – the sandwiches can’t be beat. This is a super popular lunch spot for locals, so be prepared to wait during the lunch rush. The sandwiches are worth the wait, and there is outdoor seating for the nice weather days. I love the Cuban sandwich or build your own on the asiago bread.

Best Barbecue/Brunch:

Smokey’s Kitchen: Barbecue was the food I missed most during my 5 years as a vegetarian, and Smokey’s does not disappoint! I love the pulled pork sandwich and the garlic fries, but prepare to be garlicky for hours afterwards. They also do awesome (huge) brunch meals with a decent beer selection and big screen tvs, so it’s an off the beaten path place to watch football in the fall.

Best Grocery/Convenience Store:

Sticks Market: So you’re hanging out on Donner Lake’s awesome public docks and you run out of beer/chips/sunscreen/gourmet cheese. What are you going to do? Luckily, there’s Sticks Market. This adorable little market has pretty much everything you could need for a day at the beach and a great beer selection too! Note: I bought so much Deschutes Fresh Squeezed there this summer that the owner started (good-naturedly) teasing me about it.

 

I bought this Ninkasi Total Domination at Sticks Market!
I bought this Ninkasi Total Domination at Sticks Market!

Planning a California North Coast Road Trip

So I’ve mentioned a few times that Greyson and I went on an amazing road trip up the North Coast of California. We managed to hit a bunch of must-see spots, both well known and off the beaten path.

Planning a CA North Coast Road Trip // tahoefabulous.com

I’ve already written about one of the hidden gems we visited, Sinkyone Wilderness State Park, but I thought I’d share the other stops on our amazing road trip.

Road Trip Map via Google Maps

  1. Truckee, California to Inverness, California (200 miles, 3.5 hours):We stayed at the Cottages at Point Reyes Seashore in Inverness, California for Greyson’s sister’s wedding. I’ve written about what to do in Point Reyes in the past – it’s an amazing place full of tons of things to do.
  2. Inverness, California to Westport, California (163 miles, 4.5 hours via Hwy 1):We headed north on the legendary Highway One, on our way to Fort Bragg and Westport-Union Landing Beach. In the Fort Bragg area, I knew I wanted to return to Pacific Star Winery and eat fresh seafood. I got my wish, and we tasted wines and watched a new batch of grapes be unloaded at the winery while the staff gave us a tour and let us taste test the different grape varieties. We ate dinner at Sea Pal Cove restaurant, where I had local rockfish fish and chips.  I had been to the area before, and I knew that I wanted to stay in a private that I had discovered allowed camping on the sand, north of Fort Bragg on Westport Beach – Westport Beach RV Park. Though it is also an RV park, the tent camping sites are secluded from the rest of the park, and all we heard all night were crashing waves.
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Beach camping at Westport Beach near Fort Bragg, CA. Photo by Greyson Howard
  1. Westport, California to Sinkyone Wilderness State Park, California (75 miles, 2.25 hours via Garberville, CA):I’ve already written about the amazing Sinkyone Wilderness State Park, but I just want to emphasize again how incredible it is! If you enjoy the outdoors, it should be on your California Bucket List. On our way to Sinkyone, we stopped for lunch in Garberville at the Eel River Cafe – a cute diner with good food in generous portions.
  2. Sinkyone Wilderness State Park, California to Redwoods State and National Parks, California (142 miles, 3.5 hours): On our way to the Redwoods, we drove through the Avenue of the Giants, a well known drive that’s definitely worth getting off the highway for.
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Avenue of the Giants. Photo by Greyson Howard

 

One of the main things Greyson wanted to see on this trip was Fern Canyon in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park(part of Redwoods National and State Parks). We found that Gold Bluffs Beach Campground was the closest access to Fern Canyon, and open on a first come-first serve basis in early October during our trip. We arrived fairly early on a Thursday, and by Thursday night the campground was pretty much full, despite it being a weeknight during the off season. If you plan on staying at Gold Bluff Beach, Fern Canyon is a pretty much year-round attraction, so plan on getting to the nearby campgrounds early in order to find a spot. Our campsite was tucked away behind some bushes for a wind break, and a quick walk to the ocean beach, surrounded by the gold cliffs that give the area its name. Fern Canyon can be accessed by a less than quarter mile hike from the parking area, but we chose a longer 7 mile loop through old growth redwoods to access the back side of the canyon. The longer hike was definitely worth it, full of wet forest plants and creatures that we don’t get to see in the Sierra, and not very strenuous at all.

Banana Slugs in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park
Banana Slugs in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park

Fern Canyon was like nothing else I’ve ever seen – sheer walls entirely covered with ferns – and worth a trip to the Redwood State and National Parks just on its own.

Fern Canyon. Photo by Greyson Howard
Fern Canyon. Photo by Greyson Howard
  1. Redwood State and National Parks, California to Nevada City, California (328 miles, 6.25 hours via Chico): The only problem we ran into on our whole road trip came on this leg. We had planned to stop in Chico, California for our last night and do a tour and tasting at Sierra Nevada Brewing Company, and just get a cheap motel room when we go into town. It turns out that we arrived on the Saturday of Parents Weekend at Chico State, and there wasn’t a room to rent within 50 miles. We ended up just having an early dinner/beer tasting at Sierra Nevada, and we pushed on to Nevada City. We grabbed a couple of beers at Matteo’s Public, and were asleep before ten in our room at the Emma Nevada House.
  2. Nevada City, California to Truckee, California (102 miles, 3 hours via Hwy 49 & 89): Since our inadvertent night in Nevada City meant that we were further along on our road trip, we decided to take the long way – Highway 49 to Highway 89 through Downieville. This route has beautiful views of the Sierra Buttes, and our quick stop in Downieville had us lamenting the fact that we didn’t have our bikes. This meandering, scenic route was the perfect end to a perfect Northern California road trip.
Looking back at the Sierra Buttes from Hwy 49
Looking back at the Sierra Buttes from Hwy 49

And finally, in true data-nerd form, here’s my spreadsheet of trip mileage, travel time and a few notes, for reference:

CA North Coast Road Trip Plan // tahoefabulous.com