Packing List: An Indonesia SCUBA Trip

I am kind of an obsessive list maker when it comes to traveling. What? I just like to be organized. Since this was my first trip to Indonesia, first ever SCUBA dive trip, and first international vacation in a long time, I was seriously stumped on how to pack. I did a lot of googling phrases like “scuba trip packing list” “what to pack for Indonesia” “how many pairs of underwear for 15 days”. While I didn’t find a one stop shop for a packing list, I cobbled together my own packing list using a few different resources (including this “how many underwear to pack” chart).

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Here’s a screenshot of my obsessively categorized and color coded packing list:

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For reference, our trip was basically 5 days of travel time (2 there, 3 back) and 10 days SCUBA diving at the resort. We really didn’t do any other traveling or activities other than SCUBA/snorkel/swim. So if you’re going to be doing any hiking, temple visiting, climbing, etc., you’ll want to reference some other lists as well. I packed a lot of things I already owned and had for a long time. For items that were specifically awesome, I’ll link to them.

Clothes:

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  • Dresses x 2 – I find dresses from “adventure” brands like Patagonia and prAna hold up to wrinkling well.
  • Spandex shorts (to wear under the dress for anti-chafing)
  • Capri pants – love these prAna ones in charcoal.
  • Lightweight black leggings
  • Running shorts x 2 – whatever quick dry running shorts you already have will work
  • T-shirt x 2 – loved the Standard Tee from Krochet Kids. It’s got a little nicer shape than a plain t-shirt and it’s sooo soft. Perfect for the airport.
  • Tank Top x 5 – I highly recommend loose, blousy tanks. I just brought old and/or cheap Target ones. The only thing I ended up not wearing was a fitted workout tank with built in bra. It seemed too hot for something that fitted! If we had gone hiking, I probably would have worn it, though.
  • SPF Long Sleeve Shirts x 3 – it felt weird taking 3 long sleeve shirts to the tropics, but I wore them every single day for sun protection. Columbia and Patgonia have nice ones.
  • Shorts x 3 – I packed knee length stretch denim shorts and, though I wore them once, I regretted it. My other ones were cheap black and khaki ones from Old Navy.
  • Sports Bra x 3 – didn’t pack a real bra, never regretted it.
  • Quick Dry Underwear x 5 – nothing is quick dry in the tropics. Wish I packed more underwear.
  • Socks x 3 – compression socks for the plane and two extras. Didn’t need the other socks.
  • Rash Guard – I have one similar to this NRS Rash Guard
  • Swim Suits – Tops x 4, Bottoms x 3  – I talk about my favorite swimsuits in this post. My favorite swimsuit brands for active ladies are prAna, Athleta, and Calavera.
  • Sweatshirt – strictly for airplane use. I brought an old zippy that I didn’t care about losing or ruining for easy on/off.

On the plane, I wore lightweight leggings, the grey Krochet Kids t-shirt, compression socks, sweat shirt, and running shoes. I looked a little sloppy, but in the airport I ditched the sweatshirt and running shoes, put on the Sanuks and the straw hat and felt like I looked presentable. In my carryon, I packed a dress, extra underwear, running shorts and my favorite swimsuit. I figured I could get by on that for awhile if my luggage got lost.

Shoes/Accessories/Other

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  • Shoes x 3: Old trail runners, Chacos,  and Sanuk yoga slings
  • Hat x 2: Straw hat and one of Greyson’s dorky visors. I forgot to bring a baseball cap, which I completely regret.
  • Sunglasses x 3:  I like these ones and these ones by Sun Cloud. They have nice, polarized lenses but aren’t so expensive that I’m terrified of losing them.
  • Sunglasses Strap: I lost this in the ocean partway through. Ooops.
  • Water Bottle: I usually use a Klean Kanteen, but I wanted the lighter/bigger Nalgene for this trip.
  • Travel Pillow/Eye Mask/Ear Plugs: Necessary for long flights
  • Headlamp: Didn’t use, but glad to have it
  • Life Straw: Ditto
  • Phone/Charger/Converter: The only electronic that I brought was my iPhone. It was my entertainment/e reader/camera/contact with the outside world. I have a LifeProof Nuud Waterproof Case so I wasn’t too worried about getting it wet, but I never brought it on the daily boat rides. Other people had GoPros and dive housing for their cameras, so I let them take all the actual SCUBA pictures.
  • Passport/Drivers License/PADI Card/Insurance Card/Credit Cards/Cash/Important Copies

Toiletries

  • Sunscreen – I’m really picky about what sunscreen I’ll use. Since we were spending so much time close to a delicate reef, it was really important to me that I use reef safe sunscreen. I brought two containers of Thinksport SPF 50, which has a good Environmental Working Group rating. It had a bit of a learning curve, as I didn’t apply enough my first time out and got a little burnt on my nose. After I figured out how much I needed to use, I really liked it, especially for my face.
  • Bug Spray with DEET
  • Waterproof Mascara/CC Cream/Eyeliner – this was the only makeup that I brought. I rarely wore any, but it was nice to have and all I needed/wanted.
  • Bronners & Conditioner
  • Dry Shampoo
  • Hair Ties & Barrettes/Wide Tooth Comb – the barrettes were essential for keeping my bangs back in the water
  • Toothpaste/Travel Toothbrush/Floss
  • Face wash wipes
  • Deodorant & Body Glide – I was so sweaty all the time, and I’m so glad I brought body glide.
  • Tweezers/Nail Clippers
  • Medicine
  • Chapstick x 6 – I am also obsessively worried about losing all my chapstick.

SCUBA Gear

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Note: I rented a BCD and regulator from Papua Explorers Resort. The resort also provided weights and a reef hook to the guests.

  • 2.5 mm Full Length Wetsuit – Greyson, you were right. Even at the equator, a full length wetsuit was the right decision.
  • Dive computer
  • Safety sausage/whistle
  • Mask/fins– I carried by mask and snorkel in my carry on.
  • Fins/booties – I got the cheapest fins & booties package at the dive shop. I wish I’d gotten slightly nicer ones since I got pretty bad hot spots on my toes.

There’s my list! While (nearly) everything I brought got used, there were a few standout products that I have to call out specifically.

Best Of:

  • Patagonia Magnolia Dress – I bought this dress in 2011 to wear in a friend’s wedding – it’s got to be the most versatile dress of all time. It barely wrinkles, it’s so comfortable and it’s super flattering. I have it in grey, but it comes in adorable patterns now.
  • Running shorts – I just brought a couple of old pairs that I had hanging around. I like them because they’re comfortable and dry quickly. I’d recommend ones without built in underwear if possible.
  • Columbia Sun Shirt – This was on sale, light, it protected me from the sun and let me live out my paleontologist fantasies. At 5’11”, the men’s medium fit me perfectly – way better than any of the women’s shirts.
  • Smartwool Strappy Sports Bra– the wool/synthetic blend helped them not smell bad, a miracle in the tropics.
  • Calavera Core Lifeguard swim top – this top was the best one to wear under my wetsuit. It’s also great to swim around in. I never worried about falling out or it coming untied, even while pulling my wetsuit on and off. It also didn’t have bulky knots.
  • Columbia Straw Hat– this hat covered my face, my neck and my dirty hair while looking pretty stylish. It also was able to be re-shaped after I crushed it into my carry on over and over.
  • BodyGlide chafing is no joke in the tropics. I used this daily for chafe-proofing my body. When I started developing hot spots on my toes, this stuff helped as well.
  • Sea to Summit Travel Pillow– I can sleep anywhere, and it’s in part due to this awesome travel pillow. It packs down so small, but blows up big and firm enough for real support.
  • 2.5 mm Full Length Wetsuit – I bought a cheap suit from Seavenger and, while I’m not sure how long it’s going to last me, it worked great for this trip. It was easy to get on and off, didn’t stretch out too much, dried as well as other pricier suits, and never started to smell bad. Note: size down! According to their measurements, I was at the top end of a size 13. I ordered that and it was way too big. Luckily, they had an 11 still in stock and I ordered that. It fit me, and it was nowhere close to too small.
  • Suunto ZOOP Dive Computer
    This is a pretty basic model, but it was very easy to use. Greyson set it up in just a couple of minutes, and all I had to do was turn it on and jump in the water. Idiot proof!

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

Wild & Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe

One of the coolest things I get to do for work every year is putting on the Wild & Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe. WSFF combines award winning environmental and adventure films with the energy of local activism. Each year we choose powerful environmental and adventure films so that attendees are inspired to take further action regarding issues that impact our environment, ourselves and our world.

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The Film Festival is the biggest fundraiser for my program, the Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership. SNAP places twenty-eight AmeriCorps members at different conservation agencies and organizations throughout the Sierra Nevada to conduct watershed restoration and monitoring, watershed education, and volunteer recruitment and support. Members serve for 11 months with different conservation organizations and agencies across the Sierra to complete watershed restoration and monitoring, watershed education, and volunteer recruitment and support.

All girl restoration

Since 2007, SNAP Members have

  • Restored more than 13,000 impaired watershed acres
  • Educated more than 155,000 individuals on environmental issues in the Sierra
  • Monitored more than 1,000 sites
  • Recruited more than 29,000 volunteers
  • Contributed more than 425,000 service hours!

Obviously, I think SNAP is an awesome program! In addition to supporting SNAP, the Film Festival is a super fun event. We have a silent auction with prizes like whitewater rafting trips, wine tasting, hotel stays, etc., an activism area where guests can learn about local environmental issues, a backstage VIP area, beer and wine, and a filmmaker Q&A.

Most importantly, the films we show are amazing. Our goal for WSFF is “adventure with a message”. We show cool people doing awesome things in beautiful locations, but the underlying message is about the importance of protecting the places we play and beyond.

Martins-Boat

This year, our first feature film is Martin’s Boat by renowned filmmaker Pete McBride.

“Preeminent conservationist David Brower called him his conscience: in the 1950’s when the Bureau of Reclamation proposed two dams in the Grand Canyon—one at Marble Canyon and the other at Bridge Canyon—the late Martin Litton made sure the Sierra Club didn’t acquiesce. Martin believed the best way for people to understand how important it was to preserve the Grand Canyon was to have them experience this secret world from the river, but not in just any boat. Martin pioneered whitewater dories on the Colorado River in the 1960’s and started a proud tradition of naming the boats after wild places that had been lost or compromised by the hand of man. Now, some 50 years later, America’s open-air cathedral faces continued threats from development and mining and it’s up to all of us to ensure the crown jewel of our National Park system is protected now and for future generations. Martin’s Boat is a film that honors the legacy of Martin Litton and follows the newest boat in the Grand Canyon Dories fleet, the Marble Canyon, on its maiden voyage down the legendary Colorado River through the grandest canyon on Earth.”

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Our other feature film is Mile for Mile, made by Patagonia and filmmaker James Q. Martin.

“Ultrarunners Krissy Moehl, Jeff Browning and Luke Nelson ran 106 miles through the newly opened Patagonia Park in Chile, to celebrate and highlight Conservacion Patagonica’s efforts to rewild and protect this vast landscape. Patagonia Park, in the Aysén Region of Chile is now open to the public. The park sweeps from the northern ice cap, down to the Baker River and out to the arid borderlands of Argentina. The park’s glaciated peaks, grasslands, beech forests, lakes, rivers and wetlands still boast all of their original species—and the rivers still run free. Patagonia, Inc. has been involved in this project from day one—helping with the first land purchases, sending volunteers down to rip up hundreds of miles of fencing and restore open grasslands, and fighting mega-dam projects on the nearby Baker and Pascua Rivers.”

Noatak

In addition to these two amazing features, we’ll be showing 10 other short films ranging in length from 1 – 12 minutes focusing on climbing, paddling, skiing, hiking, and more, from Yosemite to the Grand Canyon to Antarctica.

We’ll be hosting the 11th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival – South Lake Tahoe this Thursday, March 31st in the MontBleu Resort Casino Spa Showroom. If you are in the area, I highly encourage you to attend this event! You can buy tickets ahead of time online here or in person at the Patagonia store in Heavenly Village. We’ll be selling tickets at the door, but there’s a discount if you buy ahead of time. Doors open at 6 pm; films start at 7 pm. Tickets are only $12 for Sierra Nevada Alliance Members.

Thanks for reading my schpiel about my favorite fundraiser for my favorite organization!

 

Tahoe Winter Essentials

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Well, we’ve gotten more than a couple of feet of snow in the mountains over the last few days – I’d say it’s definitely winter! While we haven’t had a ton of snow the last few winters, I’ve figured out a few things that make the winter more enjoyable.

Winter Essentials

    1. A warm blanket. Greyson got me this Nemo Puffin Blanket for my birthday and I love it. You can even button up the bottom for a cozy foot pocket.
    2. A stylish beanie. Dry, cold winter air does not do the nicest things to my fine, straight hair – neither does stuffing my hair in a snowboard helmet for hours. A cute hat can cover up post-ride hair and keep your head warm. Krochet Kids has a bunch of cute options.
    3. Helmet and Goggles. Protecting your head and eyes is just as important in the winter as it is during the rest of the years. I like helmets that have vents so you can close them when it’s colder out and open them on warmer days. I have an older version of the Smith Sequel Helmet. I’m getting these Smith Squad Goggles with interchangeable lenses.
    4. Dry Shampoo. My hair gets super flat in the winter, and I can’t always throw on a hat. For those times, I swear by dry shampoo. I’ve tried a bunch of different brands, and my favorite has to be ROCKAHOLIC dry shampoo. It makes my bangs not-greasy, adds volume, doesn’t leave nearly as much white residue as other brands, and I love the smell.
    5. Down everything. There’s nothing better for cold, dry air than down. Patagonia now has 100% Traceable Down, so you know it is ethically collected. I have a Patagonia Down Sweater, a Marmot vest, and a hooded Marmot coat that are all great for different situations. Greyson even has down puffy pants that I occasionally borrow.
    6. Warm Base Layers. The most important part of staying warm while outside in the cold is a good base layer. I like natural fibers for their wicking abilities and their odor prevention. Anything from Icebreaker is super high quality like this long sleeve top and these leggings. For a cheaper brand that I’ve had great luck with, I recommend Stoic’s Alpine Merino Line. I have two pairs of bottoms and a long sleeve top, and they’ve held up really well. I find them on sale on Steep and Cheap fairly often.
    7. Coffee & Coffee Accessories. I drink coffee all year round, but there’s something special about a steaming hot cup of coffee when the temperature is below freezing. I’ve mentioned my love for the insulated Klean Kanteen before, which will keep your coffee hot for up to 6 hours! To make the best coffee, I like to use a pour over coffee maker or a French Press. Etsy also has a ton of adorable ceramic pour over coffee makers if you’re looking for something handmade. Last year, I splurged on this automatic Burr Mill for amazing, fresh ground beans.
    8. A Super Nice Ice Scraper: At one point, I had a really nice long handled scraper with an attached broom, but I lent it out, never got it back, and now make do with a regular scraper and cold hands. I also wouldn’t say no to this ice scraper with mitt attached.

These essentials would make great gifts – for yourself or anyone who needs help staying warm this winter.

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

Sierra Fall Essentials

The leaves are changing, the weather has cooled off, and I’ve started craving pie at every meal. It’s fall!Boots, scarves, tea, pumpkin spice lattes, etc – there are many things that people consider essentials for the autumn season. Here’s my list of must-haves for a perfect fall in the mountains.

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  1. Boots that can handle rain and a little bit of snow:During a normal year, most of the precipitation that falls in Tahoe comes down in the form of snow. The last few years have been anything but typical, and, fall is our rainiest season. I have these amazing Sorel Women’s Winter Boots for heavy snows, but I wanted something a bit lighter and more puddle proof for fall. A bunch of my New Englander friends clued me in to the wonder that is the Original Duck Boot by LL Bean. More commonly known as “Bean Boots”, these things are amazing. I have the 8 Inch Women’s Bean Boots. They keep my feet dry, are way lighter than my snow boots, don’t make my feet swampy like previous all-rubber boots and can handle a few inches of snow with ease. Since mine are unlined, I got mine a little big (I normally wear a 10.5, got the 11) and wear them with fluffy wool socks and sweater pants. I couldn’t be happier!
  2. Wool clothing: See above. I have a bunch of Smartwool Socks – including biking, running, hiking,skiing/compressionand fluffy, a pair of Smartwool footless tights (aka sweater pants), and a Smartwool Sports Bra.

LL Bean Boots and Smartwool Leggings

Bean Boots and Sweater Pants

I also have a great soft shell jacket from Icebreaker and a wool base layer that I got at the Patagonia outlet years ago. Why wool? According to Sierra Trading Post, “Wool is one of nature’s best insulating fibers and has been used to make clothing for centuries. Not only is wool extremely good at holding in warmth, it also wicks moisture and dries faster than cotton.” Wool is definitely worth the cost, and it smells way better than synthetic fabrics after sweating. Just a warning – I dry my socks in the dryer, but all of my other wool products get laid flat for drying.

  1. Something to keep my tea and coffee hot. I have and use a double walled, stainless steel bottle from both Hydro Flask and Klean Kanteen. I slightly prefer the Klean Kanteen, mostly because I think the lid holds on to less smells/flavors that the Hydro Flask Both do an excellent job keeping my tea and coffee hot for hours – up to 6!
  2. A raincoat: Living in Bellingham and Seattle for 6+ years, I’ve worn a lot of raincoats. I think that I finally have a favorite!

Patagonia Torrentshell Rain Jacket

The Patagonia Torrentshell is slightly visible in this picture of Yosemite Valley last October.

While not the lightest or the most packable, the Patagonia Torrentshell raincoat keeps me totally dry while still looking pretty cute. I was at a mostly outdoor work training last week, and it poured for much of Saturday. The Torrentshell kept me dry, warm and comfortable the whole time. This time, I wore it over my Patagonia Half Zip Fleece, but I have also worn it over a puffy vest or down coat for wet snowboarding days.

  1. A seasonal drink: While Negronis might be the drink of the summer, come fall, I’m drinking something different. I crave darker beers (like Great Basin Brewing’s Outlaw Milk Stout) and I start enjoying my ales over nitro – like thisAlibi Ale Works Pale Ale. When it comes to something a little harder, I like the Boulevardier(aka a Negroni that replaces the gin with rye). I bought a huge thing of Bulleit Rye at Costco, and we are enjoying slowly going through that.

Sierra Fall Essentials // tahoefabulous.com

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!