Mountain Biking Dry Pond Loop, Reno, NV

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com

With this super long winter we’ve been having, I’ve been having so much fun exploring the trails in the lower elevations surrounding Truckee. Last weekend, Greyson and I checked out some new-to-us trails in the Mount Rose area of Reno, as you might have seen in my video. We rode the Dry Pond Loop counterclockwise, and it was a great intermediate ride, on the easier side of intermediate. It’s about 6.5 miles and a little over 1,000 of climbing, with most of the climbing coming in the first half.

Check out my video of the Dry Pond Loop here!

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com
Trail Map via Strava

This loop is below Mount Rose in the Galena area, south and west of downtown Reno off of Highway 431. We parked at the Thomas Creek Trailhead parking area (Click here for Google Map directions) and headed up Thomas Creek Trail right from the large parking lot. This trail climbs steadily, but not too steeply along Thomas Creek through aspen groves and into the pines. We saw a ton of hikers with dogs on this section of the trail, but nearly everyone was very friendly. After about 1.5 miles and ~500 feet of climbing, Thomas Creek Trail intersects with the Dry Pond Trail.

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com

Dry Pond Trail continues to climb, and the climb definitely gets steeper at this point, and there are a few very tight and steep switchbacks that I struggled with. Dry Pond trail takes you through a curly leaf mountain mahogany forest, which is really cool. I’d only ever seen bush sized mountain mahogany before. There are also really sweeping views looking down into the Washoe Valley.

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com

After about 1.2 miles and another ~440 feet of climbing, we arrived at the dry pond that gives the trail it’s name. We stopped here to have a snack and admire the awesome view of Mount Rose across the meadow. The Dry Pond Trail starts heading downhill almost immediately after the meadow, and the trail on the south side was pretty different from what we’d just climbed up. While the climb up was mostly dirt with some embedded rocks and roots, the downhill was looser, rockier and more exposed. It’s all very rideable, but I was amazed at the quick change in the terrain.

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com

At about mile 3.8, Dry Pond Trail intersects Whites Creek Trail. We turned left and continued down hill. Whites Creek Trail isn’t as steep as Dry Pond, and it’s back in the pines and aspen groves. The trail isn’t a “flow trail”, but I thought it was fast and flowy, with lots of little rock gardens and objects to pop off of that you can choose to challenge yourself on. It also gets a little sandy in spots, especially towards the bottom, and I imagine it will be even more sandy later in the summer. As we got closer to the end, we started to encounter more bikers, hikers, and dogs, but generally people were really friendly. Whites Creek Trail dead ends at N. Timberline Dr. where we turned left and headed the last half mile back to the car. There’s a tiny bit of a climb back to the parking area, and my legs were dead at this point. It was almost comical how hard the less than 75 feet of climbing felt to me.

Dry Pond Loop // tahoefabulous.com

I really enjoyed riding the Dry Pond Loop. There were great views, interesting ecosystems, friendly people, and enough challenge to make it entertaining. I think this would be a great trail to take newer riders on.

Trail Stats
Location: Mt. Rose, Reno, NV
Mileage: 6.6 miles
Elevation Gain: 1,025
Difficulty: Easier Intermediate
See my Strava Route here!
Washoe Land

We’re Going to Costa Rica!

Greyson and I have taken a lot of really awesome road trips over the past five years. These trips have been amazing, but they’ve been largely mountain bike focused (with a little hiking and climbing thrown in), and I’ve been craving something different. Like the amazing SCUBA trip to Raja Ampat, Indonesia we did with his family a few years ago.

Raja Ampat, Indonesia // tahoefabulous.com
Greyson and I on an amazing, non road trip vacation in Indonesia. Take me back to the beach!

We’ve been saving up our vacation days and racking up credit card miles for awhile now, and we just booked our plane tickets to Costa Rica! We’re not going until November, but I’m excited to use the next 6 months to plan an incredible trip. Right now, we don’t have anything booked, and we only have the vaguest ideas of what we want to do. I’m hoping that we get some recommendations! Here’s the facts:

  • We’ll be there for 9 days at the end of the rainy season, flying in to and out of San Jose.
  • We want to do the mountains, the beach, some river rafting, SCUBA-ing, and potentially an overnight to Panama, if we can squeeze it in.
  • We don’t want to be traveling the whole time – we want to spend at least a few days in each place.
  • I’ve been to the Pacific side of Costa Rica before, so we want to go to the Caribbean side.
  • We’re not renting a car, so travel by bus it is!

So what I’m thinking is, first, take a shuttle from San Jose to Arenal/La Fortuna area and spend a few days there, doing hiking and hot springs. Second, a one or two day river rafting trip on the Pacuare River, using the river raft company to travel from the mountains to the coast. Third, spend some time in Cahuita or Puerto Viejo for beach time, SCUBA, and a short trip into Panama before heading back to San Jose to head home.

Raja Ampat, Indonesia // tahoefabulous.com
Diving in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

People who have done Costa Rica before, does this seem reasonable for 9 days? Also, does anyone have any recommendations, specifically for places to stay in Arenal, Pacuare river raft companies, and if Cahuita or Puerto Viejo is better for a beach town base?

I’m so excited!

Hot Weather Mountain Biking

The weather is finally getting warmer up here in Truckee, and it’s already pretty hot down in the foothills. That means it’s finally time for summer mountain biking!

Summer Weather Mountain Biking // tahoefabulous.com

Summer is really the high season for mountain biking in the higher elevations. While it’s significantly cooler up here, it can still get pretty hot during the day, plus the sun seems to beat down even harder at altitude and it’s easy to get dehydrated. There are tons of ways to deal with hydration while mountain biking, and I’m going to lay out some details, recommendations, pros, and cons for my favorites.

Summer Weather Mountain Biking // tahoefabulous.com

Hydration Packs: Hydration packs are backpacks that contain a water reservoir attached to a hose with a mouth piece that you can drink out of without stopping to pull out a bottle or take off the path. Quite a few brands make hydration packs, and they come in a wide variety of sizes, price points, and designs, including mountain bike specific ones. While generally hydration packs have the reservoir oriented vertically, mountain bike specific ones often have the reservoir horizontally across the lower back. Other specific features that mountain bike hydration packs often have include additional armoring for crash protection, big hip pockets for storage, helmet clips, and a suspension system to help keep the pack off of your sweaty back. While it’s completely possible to wear a hiking style hydration pack while mountain biking, I prefer the bike specific styles. I actually wear my Camelbak Solstice hiking and on short trail runs, which it works great for as well.

Summer Mountain Biking Gear // tahoefabulous.com

I have and recommend the CamelBak Solstice LR ($88). Other popular, well reviewed mountain bike specific hydration packs are the Osprey Packs Raptor ($140), CamelBak M.U.L.E. ($82), and Dakine Drafter ($88). The pros for hydration packs are that they give you the ability to pack a lot of gear, the ability to carry quite a bit of water, they distribute their weight across your whole back for comfort and stability, there a lot of options at a lot of price points, and they can be used for a variety of outdoor activities. The cons are that they tend to be on the heavy side, they can be hot and increase sweating during the ride, and having more contact points give more opportunities for chafing.

Summer Weather Mountain Biking // tahoefabulous.com

Waist Packs: Fanny packs are finally back in style, but mountain bike specific fanny packs are a little different than the ones I remember from the early 90s. They are a little bigger than the purse style packs, usually have some sort of hydration system – either a spot for a small bottle or a reservoir and hose, and a wider waistband for comfort and stability.

Summer Mountain Biking Gear // tahoefabulous.com

I got the Dakine Hot Laps 2L ($40) for Christmas, and I love it – see my detailed review here. Other well reviewed mountain biking waist packs are Osprey Packs Seral ($83), Patagonia Black Hole Waist Pack ($59), and CamelBak Repack LR ($56). The pros for waist packs include that they are light weight, they allow for more air flow across your back, and that there are fewer pressure points that might cause chaffing. On the downside, you can’t carry as much gear or water, there are fewer quality options, and they move around more while riding.

Other Hydration Strategies: The simplest, cheapest way to hydrate on your bike is with a water bottle in your bottle cage(s). For really hot days, you can even get insulated bike bottles, like this one from the REI Outlet, to keep your water cold. This has the advantage of being really easy, but it limits how much water you can bring and some full suspension bikes have one or fewer spots to mount your bottles. Also, you’ll have to find somewhere to store your tools/tube/snacks/keys/phone/etc. There are also mountain biking specific hydration vests, like the CamelBak Chase ($75), but I’ve never tried any out, so I don’t have any opinions or recommendations on those.

Basically, if I’m going on a shorter, hot mountain bike ride, I’ll use my Dakine Hot Laps with a bottle in my cage and if I’m going on a long, hot mountain bike, I’ll use my Camelbak Solstice with a bottle in my cage. Often, I’ll put some kind of electrolyte drink in my bike bottle with plain water in my Solstice or in the small bottle in my Hot Laps. For shorter rides, Nuun Active tablets have electrolytes without many calories, and I like Tailwind Nutrition Endurance Fuel when I need more nutrition along with electrolytes. Tailwind has about 100 calories per serving and is really easy on my stomach, especially when it’s hot out.

Summer Weather Mountain Biking // tahoefabulous.com

Lightweight Gear: I tend to get really hot when I exercise, and I used to always want to ride in tank tops in the summer. But between getting scraped up in crashes and sun damage worry, I’m coming around to light weight, long sleeve bike jerseys. My lightest weight one is the Pearl Izumi Launch 3/4 Sleeve Jersey ($50) which I’ve had for a couple of years and really like it. Slightly heavier but incredibly tough is Troy Lee Designs Ruckus ($36) jersey that I’ve had for almost ten years and that has held up through a bunch of crashes. My newest light weight jersey is the Patagonia Nine Trails Bike Jersey ($59). I’ve worn it on a couple of rides now, and I really like it. It’s a little warmer than the others, but it’s still a great summer option. While I usually wear the same baggies year round, I reach for shorter chamois during the heat of the summer, like the Pearl Izumi Women’s ESCAPE Sugar ($60) and the REI Co-op Junction 5 Inch Inseam ($35).

Summer Mountain Biking Gear // tahoefabulous.com

While it’s tempting to skip gloves when it’s really hot out, I always regret that decision when my hands are still sweaty, but now it’s harder to grip the bars. I finally got lightweight gloves for this summer, specifically the Giro Rivet CS ($35), which I’ve used a few times and really like. I have SixSixOne Recon lightweight knee pads ($60) as well. If it’s really warm, I’ll strap them on my pack for the climb and put on for the downhill, but they’re also comfortable enough to pedal in if needed. Greyson also recently got the Kali Protectives Strike ($85), and he really likes them. Finally, having a lightweight helmet is a key factor in staying cool. I highly recommend the Bell Super 3R ($230), which is super ventilated and has a removable chin bar that you can take off for the climbs.

I hope this has been helpful when planning your hot weather bike rides!

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

VIDEO: Dry Pond Loop, Reno, NV

Yesterday, Greyson and I rode some new-to-us trails in Reno, near Mount Rose. We did the Dry Pond Loop counterclockwise, riding up the Thomas Creek Trail, continuing on to Dry Pond Trail, and finishing on Whites Creek Trail.

Things to Do in Truckee-Tahoe When It’s Raining

Rainy Day Activities for Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com

Ugggghhh, I am not happy about this return to winter! I am ready for long, sunny days at the lake, hikes, mountain biking, and drinking beer on patios. We’re in for quite a stretch of rainy days, but luckily there’s plenty of things to do in Truckee and Tahoe when the weather isn’t great.

Bars, Breweries and Restaurants
Eating and drinking is always a fun indoor activity, and this area has a number of great ones. Here are some of my favorites:

  • Alibi Ale Works Brewery (Truckee & Incline Village): This brewery has awesome beer and something going on most nights of the week – from outdoor movies to trivia to knitting to open mikes to charity bingo to live music, there’s something for almost everyone. Check out my brewery review here!
  • Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar and Moody’s Bistro (Truckee): For a fancier night out in Truckee, these two restaurants are my favorites. Cottonwood has an amazing view of downtown Truckee and Moody’s is perfectly located for bar hopping after dinner. Both restaurants have great food and fun cocktails.
  • West Shore Pizza (Tahoma): This place has my favorite pizza in the area, great beer, and a casual, laid back atmosphere that makes it a great place to hang out while it’s raining.
  • Artemis Lakefront Cafe (South Lake Tahoe): If you want to eat with a lake view while staying dry, I love Artemis Lakefront Cafe in South Lake’s Ski Run Marina. Their whole menu is amazing, but especially their brunch food (Baklava French toast? Come on!). They also have a full bar, so you can get a real Bloody Mary. Artemis has two locations with great food, but only the Lakefront Cafe has brunch and view.
  • South Lake Brewing Company (South Lake Tahoe): Located in the more industrial part of town, South Lake Brewing Company is worth the trek. Their beer is great (be sure to try the Trail Builder Pale if it’s on draft – proceeds from this beer benefit TAMBA). The big warehouse setting means there’s plenty of room for games, well behaved dogs, and large groups.
Rainy Day Activities in Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
Beer at Alibi Ale Works in Truckee and Incline Village.

Indoor Activities
While Tahoe and Truckee are known for their outdoor activities, there are a ton of fun things to do indoors (even ones that don’t involve the casinos!) if you know where to look. Here are some of my favorites.

  • Go see a movie at Tahoe Art Haus (Tahoe City). This awesome theater serves beer, wine, and gourmet popcorn and is locally owned. They have a great mix of blockbusters (the staff all dresses up for Star Wars movies!), indie movies, outdoor films, and local events.
  • High Altitude Fitness (Incline Village) and Blue Granite (Meyers): If it’s too wet to climb outside, there are a couple of great climbing gyms in the area. I’ve spent a lot of time climbing at High Altitude Fitness, which has top roping, auto belay and bouldering, as well as a high end gym feel, including a sauna and smoothie bar. I haven’t actually climbed at Blue Granite yet, but have heard rave reviews from friends who have.
  • If yoga is more your speed, I recommend Tahoe Yoga & Wellness (Truckee), Tahoe Yoga Shala (South Lake Tahoe). I’ve also taken some really fun aerial yoga/aerial arts classes at Inversion Tahoe.
  • There’s frequently great live music in the Truckee-Tahoe area. Some of the best venues to check out are The Divided Sky (Meyers), Crystal Bay Club (Crystal Bay), and the casinos in South Lake Tahoe.
Rainy Day Activities in Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
Indoor Climbing at High Altitude Fitness

Get Outside Anyway
With the right gear and some planning, there are plenty of outdoor activities to do in the rain. Hiking is probably the easiest activity to do in the rain – all you need is a raincoat and some waterproof shoes!

Rainy Day Activities in Tahoe Truckee // tahoefabulous.com
A sunnier day on the Sagehen Creek Loop Trail

Biking is a little more challenging in the rain, but doable, especially if you stick to roads, gravel and paved trail. Most of the mountain bike trails in Truckee and Tahoe aren’t designed to be ridden in the wet, and will get damaged or destroyed if ridden while muddy. As much as I hate doing it, I stay off the trails until they’ve dried out enough to be safely ridden.

  • My rainy biking gear is pretty similar to hiking, with a rain coat and light baselayer. My raincoat is bright orange, which is great for visibility, but if you have a darker or more neutral color, maybe add a lightweight safety vest for visibility. I skip the rain pants and wear thick, knicker length pants – the Pearl Izumi Sugar Thermal Tights. I also wear full finger gloves when it’s rainy and cold. The Giro LA DND work great for this. There is all sorts of other gear for long road rides in the rain, like shoe covers, under helmet hats, etc., but honestly, my rides in the rain don’t last long enough to need it.
  • My recommended rainy day road rides are the Donner Lake Loop (Truckee), the Olympic Valley to Tahoe City Bike Path (Tahoe City) and exploring the miles of bike paths in South Lake Tahoe.

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

VIDEO: Mountain Biking Mills Peak Trail

Greyson and I went up to Graeagle yesterday to ride one of our favorite trails – Mills Peak Trail. A lot of the trail is still buried in snow, but the lower parts are open. We climbed up the bottom third and rode back down. The trail is in great condition and it was a super fun ride. Here’s a video we made of some of what we rode yesterday!

Try This Beer: GoatHouse Brewing Co, Lincoln, CA

I visited one of my new favorite breweries last month – GoatHouse Brewing Co! GoatHouse not only has delicious beer, it is also features GOATS. I grew up with pygmy goats, and they will always take any excuse to spend time with them. So GoatHouse Brewing combines beer and goats, two of my all time favorite things.

GoatHouse Brewing // tahoefabulous.com

“Goats are an integral part of the GoatHouse farm. Farm-to-tap takes on an additional meaning as the herd of dairy goats provide abundant milk (and cheese) for our family. The ever-expanding herd also endlessly entertain with their quirky personalities, and present an opportunity to educate people about animal husbandry, where milk comes from, cheesemaking, and 4H. The goats take on an important role in the hops by pruning and subsequently fertilizing the fields. In the Spring, after the babies arrive, Goat Yoga is intermittently offered to immerse yourself in an authentic farm experience. Last but certainly not least, is the herd protector and crowd favorite, Rory the donkey.”

GoatHouse Brewing // tahoefabulous.com

GoatHouse Brewing is located out in the country, northeast of Sacramento, near Lincoln. Greyson and I stopped by after riding the Culvert & Confluence trails in Auburn. While it’s not as close to the awesome Auburn biking as Knee Deep or Moonraker, it’s only about 25 minutes away and worth the drive.

The brewery is kid and leashed & well behaved dog friendly and you can bring in your own food. There’s goat yoga on Saturdays during baby goat season in the spring! I’ve also been there when there was a food truck, but the line was looooong. As far as the beer goes, I really like it!

GoatHouse Brewing // tahoefabulous.com

Beer:
Hazy SOB (3.5/5) Low octane, big flavor New England IPA
IPA Brah (4/5) Single IPA featuring Citra, Simcoe, and Mosaic hops
Blondage A Go-Go (4.25/5) Blonde Ale that will have you screaming for more.

If you’re in the Sacramento area and looking for a fun, unique brewery experience – check out GoatHouse Brewing Co.

Dakine Hot Laps 2L Review

As someone who grew up in the 90’s, I was very into fanny packs in elementary school. That said, I was a little surprised when they became so popular for mountain biking. I thought they’d be too small and move around too much, but after reading a bunch of reviews and trying on several different models, I got the Dakine Hot Laps 2L Hip Pack for Christmas from Greyson. I’ve done quite a few rides with it, ranging from a short lap of a smooth flow trail to a 20 mile gravel/singletrack/road combo ride to a steep, rocky, and loose route. I’m really impressed!

Dakine Hot Laps 2L Bike Pack Review // tahoefabulous.com

When I was shopping, I knew that I wanted something without a bladder, ruling out the popular Osprey Packs Seral. I also knew that I wanted a way to hold a water bottle, so the low profile Dakine Hot Laps Stealth wouldn’t work. The Hot Laps 2L was one of the few packs that met my criteria, and it had great reviews.

Now that I’ve worn the Hot Laps on a half dozen rides, I think that I can give my review on the bag. Even when packed full, the bag doesn’t bounce around when it’s worn and tightened correctly. For shorter rides, I’ll only use one water bottle, stored in the cage and not use the water bottle loop on the Hot Laps. In that situation, I center the bag in the middle of my back. If I am using the bottle holder, I orient it slightly to the side, so the heavy bottle is closer to the center of my back, which evens out the weight to reduce bounce and side to side sway.

Dakine Hot Laps 2L Review // tahofabulous.com
Photo from fanatikbike.com

For comfort and stability, tighten the hip belt really tight on the downhills and loosen it on the climbs, if possible. I don’t really like things tight around my waist, and I was worried that would be something I couldn’t handle with a waist bag. The Hot Laps hasn’t bugged me at all in that way, I think in part due to the fact the hip belt strap is wide, so it doesn’t have the “cutting in” feeling that thinner straps do.

For its small size, the Hot Laps can fit a fair amount of gear. I’ve maxed out the storage to fit a multi tool, tube, phone, snacks, and thin additional layer (the Patagonia Houdini, which packs really small) or tube, pump, tool, phone, and keys, depending on the ride. This isn’t a pack to take if you’re going very far or alone. I’ve generally used it on rides that are short, close to home, or with another person who is carrying most of the tools (thanks, Greyson!). If I’m going on a longer ride or going by myself, I stick with my 10 L CamelBak Solstice.

I also love that my back gets so much less sweaty when wearing this pack. i’ve worn it on a couple of hotter rides, and I was so glad not to have the sweaty, bulky pack on. I think the Dakine Hot Laps 2L is an awesome pack for a specific purpose – shorter and hotter rides when you don’t want or need to pack a ton of stuff with you. I wouldn’t have the Dakine Hot Laps as my only biking bag, but I’m glad I’ve added it to my gear closet.

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

VIDEO: Mountain Biking the Hoot Trail in Nevada City

I got myself a GoPro HERO7 Black, and I’ve started playing around with it. This weekend, Greyson, my friend Kelly and I headed back to Hoot Trail in Nevada City and rode a couple of laps. Here’s a short video of one of the laps!

Thanks to Greyson for editing this together!

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I receive a small percentage of the sale as compensation – at no additional cost to you. I promise to only recommend products that I use and enjoy!

Point Reyes Gravel Bike Ride

Point Reyes Gravel Biking // tahoefabulous.com

Last month, Greyson and I took our new-ish gravel bikes down to Point Reyes and rode a ~20 mile loop. I had taken my Diamondback Haanjo Trail (full review coming soon) on a few road rides and on one trail ride, but they were all pretty short and I was excited to see how the bike did on a longer route with a mix of road, trail, and gravel riding. I can’t take credit for this route, Greyson did all of the research and put it together. It was challenging (especially the road climb!) but fun, and it had amazing views.

Point Reyes Gravel Ride // tahoefabulous.com
Trail Map via Strava

We started from the Cottages at Point Reyes Seashore, which is on Sir Frances Drake Blvd, near Chicken Ranch Beach. We turned left onto Sir Frances Drake and headed west, immediately uphill and climbed about 350 feet in about 0.75 miles before heading down again. I’m not a huge fan of riding with cars, and Sir Frances Drake is pretty narrow and highly trafficked on the weekends. That said, cars seemed to expect to see bikers and gave us plenty of space. After about 2.3 miles, we turned left onto Mount Vision Road for another section of climbing. I spent a lot of time on the trainer this winter, so I wasn’t entirely out of bike shape. That said, this climb was really hard, especially as my first long, outdoor ride of the season. The climb is more than 1,200 feet in about 4.5 miles. Part of the road is currently washed out, and passable by bikes but not cars. It was awesome to ride without worrying about vehicles, but we did have to hike a bike through the landslide section.

Point Reyes Gravel Ride // tahoefabulous.com

Mt. Vision Road dead ends at a trail at the top of Mt. Vision (after quite a few false summits!) and there’s an awesome view of the whole point. Greyson and I took a break here to have a snack and rest our legs. The road ends and turns into the Inverness Ridge Trail about 4.5 miles from the Sir Frances Drake turn off. It starts as a fairly wide double track, but quickly gets pretty narrow and on the steep side. While it’s definitely doable by a competent rider on a gravel bike, I think it would be pretty challenging for someone with beginner bike handling skills. However, that’s a pretty small percentage of the Inverness Ridge Trail section, and the rest of it is much more rideable. There’s a mix of single track, double track and fire road, which was really fun on our gravel bikes. This section is multi use, so watch out for hikers and equestrians! The Inverness Ridge Trail section is about 2.7 miles and drops 450 feet with a couple of short climbs sprinkled throughout.

The trail ends at Limantour Road, which we turned left on for a long, fun downhill road ride. This road had a nice wide shoulder for the most part and less traffic than other sections. Limantour Road actually parallels a couple of trails, but, unfortunately, they’re not open to bikes. Limantour Road dead ends at Bear Valley road after about 4.5 miles and ~770 feet of descent. We turned left on Bear Valley Road, which turns into Sir Frances Drake after less than 0.5 miles, to head back towards the Cottages. This section is almost entirely flat, and I was glad to get out of the drops on my bike and stretch out my back. It was a little unnerving to be so close to cars again after being on trails and empty, wide roads for so long, but again cars were great about giving us space.

Point Reyes Gravel Ride // tahoefabulous.com
Via Strava

We arrived back at the Cottages at almost exactly 19 miles, so I rode around the property until I hit 20! All in all, this was a fun, challenging ride, and I’m excited to try it again when I’m in better shape. Maybe mid-summer? If you’re in the Point Reyes area and looking for a ride with a nice mix of road, gravel, and single track, I highly recommend this loop. Click here to check out my Strava Route.

Trail Stats:
Location: Point Reyes National Seashore, California
Mileage: 19 miles
Elevation: ~2,300 feet
Coast Miwok & Graton Rancheria Land